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Summer hiking thread


Swayin

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Awesome pix Jim! Really amazing stuff. The couple of images you took in my neck of the woods are some of my favorite haunts. The Mount Baker-area trip on your way up to Artists Point is a rocky promontory called Panorama Dome; one of my favorite trails, the Lake Ann trail, lies in the valley at the bottom of it, just at the bottom of your pic. And hidden in the clouds in the background is Mount Shuksan, also a pretty impressive sight when it is out. The Chuckanuts are where I spend most of my time on my mountain bike.

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18 hours ago, Cockyandproud said:

Jim, those are amazing.  

My wife and I are planning to head to South Dakota in about two weeks.  I'm hoping to get some hiking in while in the Badlands.

Awesome! Are you driving? You can integrate some hikes in your drives if you plan for it. It adds some fun to your driving. 

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21 hours ago, Swayin said:

Awesome pix Jim! Really amazing stuff. The couple of images you took in my neck of the woods are some of my favorite haunts. The Mount Baker-area trip on your way up to Artists Point is a rocky promontory called Panorama Dome; one of my favorite trails, the Lake Ann trail, lies in the valley at the bottom of it, just at the bottom of your pic. And hidden in the clouds in the background is Mount Shuksan, also a pretty impressive sight when it is out. The Chuckanuts are where I spend most of my time on my mountain bike.

Baker was socked in and snowed up. I did get good pics of Shuksan. Still crazy there is snow on the ground in July/Aug. They ski year round on Mt Hood, east of Portland. :shok:

Those big trees are the bomb. I can't tell which is which...but sequoias, redwoods, Douglas firs, spruce, and large pines. And as you go up and down in elevation, different trees appear. 

Some of the roads in your area of WA remind me of parts of the lowcountry with all the trees hanging over the road. 

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43 minutes ago, JimG said:

Baker was socked in and snowed up. I did get good pics of Shuksan. Still crazy there is snow on the ground in July/Aug. They ski year round on Mt Hood, east of Portland. :shok:

Those big trees are the bomb. I can't tell which is which...but sequoias, redwoods, Douglas firs, spruce, and large pines. And as you go up and down in elevation, different trees appear. 

Some of the roads in your area of WA remind me of parts of the lowcountry with all the trees hanging over the road. 

Around here our two biggies are Western redcedars and Douglas firs.  I have some massive ones on my property that I love but which sometimes give me the willies when the wind really starts to blow!

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  • 3 weeks later...
3 hours ago, Swayin said:

I know!! The top two things to do that I don't have:

1. The fitness (who does)

2. The ability to plan such an endeavor.

Even if someone is physically able to do that the logistics involved to pull it off is quite an accomplishment in it's own right.

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  • 4 weeks later...

As I had mentioned earlier, my wife and I had planned to go to South Dakota to do some sightseeing and hiking, but when my dad passed away, and my mom was in the hospital, we had to do a lot of cleaning, and remodeling to get her house ready to sell, or be more accessible for her.  That took 3-4 weeks, during which time I was hardly working at all, so we had to re-do our plans, which meant moving the trip back and shortening it.  We decided to go to West Virginia, instead of South Dakota.  We went to Fayetteville, and parked the camper at a little campground about two miles from the New River Gorge Bridge.  The gorge became the focal point of our hiking, and did not disappoint.  That area is absolutely gorgeous.  

We hiked down Long Point Trail, which is a very easy trail that overlooks the gorge, and you can see the New River Gorge Bridge across from you.  I am afraid of heights, so I did not get near the cliff edge.  Some of the pictures required a lot of concentration on my part, because I was closer to the edge of dropoffs than I care to be, and the heights were dizzying.  The center of the bridge is almost 1200 feet from the river, and some of the areas we were in had drops anywhere from 100' to 800'.  That scares the crap out of me, especially when my dog stood on the edge and looked down about a 500' drop.  I thought she was going over.

We also hiked down to Nuttallburg, which is an old, abandoned coal mining town in the gorge.  It operated from the 1880's to the 1950's.  Not much remains now but the coal chute and tipple, (the mine was halfway up the gorge, and the coal had to be transported down to the rail line at the bottom of the gorge, that ran beside the river) and the foundations of the buildings and houses.  I stood for quite a while looking at the piers of some of the houses, thinking about the people who were born, lived and died in that area, and no one knows who they are, and all that remains is the foundations of the houses in which they lived.  It's just kind of sobering when you think about it.

We also went to Babcock State Park and looked at the grist mill, and did a little more of a walk than a hike.

The pictures of the New River Gorge Bridge don't do it justice.  It is so enormous, and the engineering, and execution of the construction is mind-blowing.  How they could do that is amazing.  I highly recommend seeing this.

Here are some pictures of our adventures.

I have tried to capture some of the color and beauty, but it doesn't come through.  I have tried to edit and add descriptions of what they are, but can't seem to make it work.  For instance, the picture with my wife standing beside the rock, is trying to show the amazing structure of the shale, and how it formed in a circular pattern. My favorite picture I took won't load for some reason, but I'll see if I can get it to work later.  One of the pictures shows a door, and that was the door to one of the 80 coke ovens in Nuttallburg, and I climbed inside to get a picture of the inside of the oven.

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