Jump to content
Gamecock Fanatics

Search the Community

Showing results for tags '2019 Gamecock Football'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • GameCock Fanatics
    • Announcements & Discussions/Suggestions Here
    • VIP Zone
    • New Member Introductions / Happy Birthday Greetings
  • Gamecock Sports
    • Gamecock Pigskin
    • Hoops Central
    • Yardcock Baseball
    • Football Recruiting News
    • Basketball Recruiting News
    • Baseball Recruiting News
    • Non-Revenue Sports
    • Gamecock Multimedia
    • Gamecock Fanatics Fan Poll
    • Gamecock & SEC Media: Gamecock & SEC Podcast
  • General Sports
    • GamecockFantics "All Sports News"
    • High School Sports
    • Rival-Pit
    • Locker Room
    • Talking SEC Sports
  • Community
    • The Photoshop Shop Room
    • Technical Chat
    • General Chat
    • The Chapel
    • Political Forum
    • GCF Swap Shop Forum
    • Fanatics Babes
    • Hall of Fame Threads
    • Test, Help And Techie Forum
  • FeatheredCocks I Bleed Garnet Club's Who is going to the first game this seson

Categories

  • Football
  • Basketball
  • Baseball
  • Recruiting
  • Other Sports
  • South Carolina News

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Gamecock Football Videos
  • Gamecock Basketball Videos
  • Gamecock Baseball Videos
  • Gamecock Other Sports Videos
  • GamecockFanatics Members Non-Sports Videos

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 82 results

  1. Thursday marks 100 days until the official start to South Carolina football's 2019 season, the 126th season in school history.
  2. Gamecocks Dot Athlon Sports Preseason All-SEC Teams 5/23/2019 | Football Eight University of South Carolina football players dot the 2019 preseason All-SEC units as selected by Athlon Sports, it was announced today. The Gamecocks had two players, wide receiver Bryan Edwards and defensive lineman Javon Kinlaw, earn second team recognition. Edwards, a 6-3, 215-pound senior from Conway, S.C., caught 55 passes for 846 yards a season ago, and has 163 career receptions for 2,229 yards. He is among the school's all-time career leaders in receptions (5th), receiving yards (6th), and receiving touchdowns (t9th) with 16. (CLICK TO VIEW)
  3. He got thrown in the fire as a true freshman. The progress he showed Gamecock coaches May 19, 2019 Hank Manos was given a tall order at the end of South Carolina’s football season. The freshman from Chapin High School had hardly played. He’d got some time at guard as Chandler Ferrell was the team’s center when other interior linemen got hurt. But in the bowl game against Virginia, he was tasked with starting at center. He admitted he battled nerves but got through those, and then got this spring to build on the experience. Well, part of the spring. “Unfortunately, he got rolled up on pretty good one day,” Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp said. “But I thought he played well at the center position. He started the bowl game for us and didn’t blink.” South Carolina’s offensive line is always a question in terms of who plays where because of the habit of working players at multiple spots. But signs point to Manos being the top candidate to start in the middle. When healthy he worked there with the first team in open practice periods. Last year’s starter, Donell Stanley said he was moving back to guard to open things up for Manos. The former wrestling state champion came to South Carolina a semester early, and had to work to change his body coming out of that sport with its weight limits. He was up around 20 pounds by the middle of spring. Eric Douglas started at center in the spring game, though he’ has the ability to be a utility lineman and play just about anywhere. The Gamecocks could also likely shift Stanley back inside if needed. But Muschamp sounded upbeat about Manos’ work in spring, injury-limited or not. The player he trusted to make his first start in a bowl game seems to have more room to grow going forward. “I think he’s a guy that progressed and continues to work,” Muschamp said. “He’s got the right kind of mentality and work ethic and the right kind of edge. I’ve very pleased with his progress.”
  4. South Carolina finally has defensive line depth. What’s the best way to deploy it? May 17, 2019 South Carolina football coach Will Muschamp will tell anyone who asks about his defensive line. After three seasons of throwing in newcomers often out of need more than anything else, he and his staff believe they have all the pieces for an SEC defensive line that boasts the depth he wants, potentially three deep at every spot. But that leads to another question, how does a staff manage that? Is there a rotation at the start? This guy gets two drives, someone else the next two? Or is it more about feel and flow of the game? “It’s a little bit of both,” defensive line coach John Scott said. “I think you go in a game with a number kind of in your mind.... You kind of have somebody helping you count the reps that somebody is getting. It’s a feel thing too, if it’s one of those games where you’ve got to have your best, best guys the whole time, you’ve got to navigate how to get other guys in because you’ve got to give them a blow sometimes as fast as offenses are going.” The word he came back to was freshness, keeping everyone fresh enough so that if the best guys need to be out there late, they have enough in the tank for that This year, South Carolina’s defense was on the field for 92 or more plays twice, 82 or more four times and 77 or more plays seven times. In 2017, before USC installed an up-tempo offense, an opposing offense got to 77 plays only three times. At the moment, this is an approximation of what South Carolina’s depth could look like: Buck: D.J. Wonnum/Brad Johnson/Rodricus Fitten Defensive tackle: Javon Kinlaw/Rick Sandidge/Zacch Pickens/Jabari Ellis Defensive tackle: Kobe Smith/Keir Thomas/Devontae Davis Defensive end: Aaron Sterling/Kingsley Enagbare/Joseph Anderson That’s not to say everyone will play a full role, as linemen can sometimes get lost in the mix (Ellis hardly played last year, but Muschamp was high on his spring performance). But in theory, the Gamecocks could be rolling bodies. USC took a step back last season in terms of work up front against the run, and the pass rush lagged as well. There’s a good bit of talent in there, but the question remains, can strength in numbers add something else as the Gamecocks look to bounce back. “One of the things that I’ve learned as a coach, and especially coaching the front, the deeper you are, the better you are,” Scott said. “So instead of a guy playing 50 snaps a game, he’s giving you 30-35 high-rep quality snaps, which means in the fourth quarter, most people don’t really sub their O-line, so you’re wearing them out. So I think that’s a huge, huge deal.”
  5. SPUS UP TOUR MOUNT PLEASANT: Coach talks OrTre Smith & other notes May 14, 2019 VIDEO COURTESY OF GAMECOCKCENTRAL.COM South Carolina football coach Will Muschamp was standing basically down the road from where OrTre Smith played his high school ball at Wando. The former four-star recruit has seen a rocky road the past half year, having a season end prematurely with a genetic knee issue. He started 10 games in place of Deebo Samuel as a true freshman, and his coach sounded upbeat about what’s coming next. “OrTre has been cleared,” Muschamp said. “He’s doing everything. Really pleased with his rehab and how that’s gone.” Smith had been limited in spring practice and didn’t go in the spring game. Smith came to Columbia as the No. 127 player in the country by the 247 Sports composite rankings. At 6-foot-4, 220 pounds, he was a towering force in high school, despite a knee injury that truncated his senior season. He got the chance most true freshmen in college dream about — inserted into the starting lineup. He posted modest numbers (30 catches for 326 yards and three touchdowns) as part of a nine-win team. He caught three passes in South Carolina’s 2018 opener but hardly played in the second game. In late September, Muschamp announced Smith was done for the season. In going through that, Muschamp saw some personal growth from his talented player. “When you take away something that is very important to you, sometimes you take that for granted,” Muschamp said. “I think he understands that. He had a very frustrating fall. He’s been a very successful player, obviously. “To have the setback ... it’s very frustrating. I think there’s certainly a maturing process that you go through.” If Smith comes back full strength, he looks like a favorite to reclaim his starting position. The Gamecocks have Shi Smith and Bryan Edwards back as starters, but behind them, there are mostly question marks in the players with a few years under their belts. NOTES: ▪ Muschamp said there’s still no update on the arrival of prep school wide receiver Tyquan Johnson who was supposed to arrive in January. He added he expects most of the rest of the 2019 class will arrive for the Summer I session, allowing for a few stragglers that seem to happen every year. ▪ The coach said he expects offensive lineman Zack Bailey will make an NFL roster after being undrafted following a broken leg late in the year. He signed with Tampa Bay.
  6. South Carolina 2019 defensive back signees Shilo Sanders and Jammie Robinson are now on campus in Columbia May 14, 2019
  7. WATCH: Muschamp previews matchup with North Carolina, talks summer workouts May 10, 2019 Football season is still over 100 days away, but that won't stop Will Muschamp or Mack Brown from getting excited and talking about it. Both coaches were at Friday's luncheon to preview August's matchup with North Carolina at Bank of America in Charlotte. View Will Muschamp's full meeting with the media below: Courtesy of GAMECOCKCENTRAL.COM
  8. Set to join group of Gamecocks with degrees, USC back ready for final ride May 07, 2019 | THE STATE Mon Denson reached an end of sorts last week. Yes, the South Carolina football running back will still be one of USC’s top backfield options in 2019. But he’ll be doing it with a degree in hand. Denson was one of about 80 athletes to finished up their undergraduate degrees this week, and he’s on track to be one of 20-plus on the football team to be in grad school next fall. “I really don’t have too many words,” Denson said. “I’m just excited to be there. First in my family, first generation, first to graduate, first to go to college.” His career started in as inauspicious as way as one could. He came to South Carolina a three-star recruit, and in his first two seasons, he didn’t see the field. Instead, another member of his class (A.J. Turner) and a member of the next class (Rico Dowdle) both surpassed him in the lineup, carrying the ball 249 times as he battled injuries. “I always saw that light at the end of the tunnel,” Denson said. “I knew once I got healthy enough I’d just be that guy. Put in the work, work on my craft and just get better and better each day.” He ended up carving out a small role as a redshirt sophomore (41 carries and 152 yards). Last season, a hamstring injuries meant he only got 16 carries in the team’s first seven games. Then he led the team in carries four times down the stretch, finishing as the second-most prolific rusher on the team (86 carries, 432 yards). He came out of spring with South Carolina coach Will Muschamp calling him one of the two best backs who was able to practice (Dowdle was not). “It meant a lot,” Denson said. “That shows that he’s seen the work I’ve been putting in. It’s going to eventually pay off.” Now he’s got one more opportunity. South Carolina’s running game hasn’t followed the preseason wisdom each of the past few years, so how things shake out for him remains a question. But he’s got his degree and a last chance, and it’s something he’ll take. “It’s relieving knowing that I’m a graduate now,” Denson said. “I’ll be playing my last year of eligibility and just be focusing on little core classes to get me by.”
  9. Paul Finebaum says South Carolina has the nation's toughest 2019 schedule May 07, 2019, | saturdaydownsouth.com There has been a lot made of South Carolina’s 2019 schedule, which many think is especially brutal. SEC West crossover games against Alabama and Texas A&M look daunting, as do games against SEC East foes Georgia and Florida. Add in a rivalry game against Clemson and nearly every week will be a battle for the Gamecocks. Recently, SEC Network host Paul Finebaum said he thinks the Gamecocks have the hardest schedule in the entire country (via 247Sports): Will the Gamecocks be strong enough to qualify for a bowl game this fall? They’ll start their 2019 quest against North Carolina on Saturday, Aug. 31.
  10. South Carolina linebacker Eldridge Thompson granted another year with the Gamecocks by NCAA May 02, 2019 South Carolina senior linebacker Eldridge Thompson has been cleared the NCAA to play in 2019. The 6-foot-1, 215-pound Houston native went through spring practice with the Gamecocks not knowing if he would be awarded an additional year of eligibility due to injuries that cost him most of two collegiate seasons. “We felt really good about it going into it,” Gamecocks head coach Will Muschamp said. “It was basically just going through the step, and I appreciate the NCAA.” Thompson played in only three games last year due to a shoulder injury. He has 15 tackles in 15 career games with South Carolina, but he is expected to contribute this year in a linebacking corps that lacks veteran experience. Thompson can play the SAM linebacker position or even nickel back for the Gamecocks, Muschamp said. “I think he’s a really good football player,” Muschamp said. “He’s a guy we certainly missed last year. He brings a lot of athleticism to that group. He’s a guy who can go play in space.”
  11. I got one that would make me dance naked down main street if we could pull off a win. CLEMSON TATERS!! Date Opponent Location Time/score Aug. 31 vs North Carolina Charlotte, N.C. Sept. 7 Charleston Southern Columbia, S.C. Sept. 14 Alabama Columbia, S.C. Sept. 21 at Missouri Columbia, Mo. Sept. 28 Kentucky Columbia, S.C. Oct. 5 Open date - - Oct. 12 at Georgia Athens, Ga. Oct. 19 Florida Columbia, S.C. Oct. 26 at Tennessee Knoxville, Tenn. Nov. 2 Vanderbilt Columbia, S.C. Nov. 9 Appalachian St. Columbia, S.C. Nov. 16 at Texas A&M Co. Station, Texas Nov. 23 Open date - - Nov. 30 Clemson Columbia, S.C.
  12. Let’s face it: USC’s ‘absolutely brutal’ schedule is THE topic of the offseason May 02, 2019, | THE STATE South Carolina’s schedule started another stir on Tuesday. This is where some readers will stop and say, “No, you started a stir on Tuesday.” We can agree to disagree there, but here’s the background: I was interviewed on Paul Finebaum’s show and was asked about South Carolina’s 2019 football schedule and the general state of the program. Here’s what I said. (I have transcribed the most pertinent parts below.) I believed then and believe now these are all reasonable comments. Here’s the part of what I said the Finebaum show tweeted out Tuesday afternoon: “2020 is the big year for Will Muschamp. 2019 is about survival on the field to set up what in 2020 is kind of a prove it year for Muschamp.” That set off, as these things often do because of the reach of Finebaum’s show and the nature of football in the South, social media reaction that kept my Twitter notifications number tilting all afternoon. (Related: Does anyone know how you extricate yourself from a Twitter conversation that devolves into an argument between two competing camps? Thanks in advance.) As is usually the case in these situations, the eventual argument had nothing to do with the original point. The first statement just becomes the launching point for what college football fan bases love the most: Mocking their rival and shaking their fist at imagined enemies. See also: November’s Muschamp voting question debacle. (Related, part two: I’m never going to engage in these debates on Twitter but feel free to reach out via email or say hello if you see me on the street.) The reality is the South Carolina’s 2019 schedule — which includes Alabama, Georgia and Clemson — is going to be THE topic of the offseason. Here’s Finebaum on the subject: “It is absolutely brutal. There is just no getting around it.” It’s a topic. It’s going to be a topic. Even if Will Muschamp doesn’t want it to be a topic. Muschamp doesn’t want it to be the biggest story of the offseason, but it’s going to be the biggest story of the season. Here’s a transcription of the exchange between Finebaum and me about USC’s schedule, among other things: Finebaum: I’m interested in the two biggest jobs on campus, the basketball and football coach. We’ll start with Frank Martin, where is he contractually? And then we’ll get to Will Muschamp. Me: I don’t deal day-to-day with basketball so I don’t know where Frank is. I know he’s not near the end of his deal, but I think this is important time for Frank Martin. He doesn’t have a tournament appearance aside from the Final Four. Now, you just can’t say ‘Aside from the Final Four.’ That’s big doings at South Carolina, but you see where Lamont Evans, a former assistant whose name has been brought up, if that eventually tracks back to the point where the NCAA says that South Carolina used an ineligible player and that banner comes down. ... It never comes out of memory banks but if the banner comes down that’s a psychic blow for the university and I think that retroactively affects Frank’s footing here. He needs to win games. Will Muschamp is under contract until 2024, and I think everybody, certainly Ray Tanner, understands what 2019’s fall looks like for Will Muschamp, so I think 2020 frankly is the big year for Muschamp. 2019 is about survival on the field to set up what in 2020 is kind of a prove-it year for Will Muschamp. Finebaum: We’re talking about three years since (Steve Spurrier) walked out. [Muschamp is] 22-17 overall. He’s .500 in the SEC. You tell me: How does that play in a community and a state where the guy down the road who Spurrier at one time beat five straight times is a regular appearer in the national championship tournament and has won two of the last three? Me: Whichever side of the Will Muschamp debate you are on you can put out a pretty good case. He’s won 22 games. That’s more than anybody has ever won here in their first three years. Spurrier had the previous record at 21. He did that after inheriting what Spurrier has acknowledged was not an SEC roster. He has improved the infrastructure of the program. He has modernized a program that Spurrier ran in a very 1990s style. … So Will has done a lot of good, but you mentioned that they’ve now lost five in a row to Clemson, which is on an unprecedented roll, and they haven’t been really close. South Carolina is not close to Clemson at the moment and that wears on the Carolina people so that’s a problem for Will. It’s not an immediate problem but it’s a problem in the future getting that thing turned around. No matter what else he does, if that thing extends to a seven-game losing streak, an eight-game losing streak, etc., etc., that’s an anchor around a coach’s neck at South Carolina. Finebaum: You alluded to the schedule. I don’t think anyone could argue against the following statement that South Carolina has the hardest schedule in the country. It is absolutely brutal. There is just no getting around it. So knowing that you have Alabama, knowing that you have Georgia and Clemson. By almost everyone’s projections, those are the No. 1, 2 and 3 schools in the country. You also have the normal lot of Florida and Tennessee and North Carolina to begin. Florida is a potential top 10 team. A&M is not far outside the top 10. We already mentioned the other three. What are fans saying? What’s the expectation for 2019? Me: Well, fans are fans. What they’re saying right now is, ‘That’s a tough schedule man. I’ll be happy with 7-5.’ And then … you finish 7-5 people when the season is over and people are not going to be happy. I think that people understand right now, as we sit here in May or April in non-football season, and everybody says, ‘We understand what’s in front of us,’ but then you get in the fall and you finish 6-6 and folks are not going to be happy. Will could have a good, solid football team and finish 6-6 without any problem. Finebaum: Let’s just say he does and goes to a bowl game and maybe has a better result than last year or doesn’t, who knows, 7-6, 6-7, because it would take an enormous effort to win more than seven games. You kept mentioning next year. So, what happens then? Let’s say it’s six straight losses to Clemson. Georgia, I’ve lost track of what it is, but I know Spurrier beat Georgia at some point but that has not gone well since then. What are people going to be saying? I realize I’m jumping ahead a year, but it’s a pretty important jump ahead. Me: That’s fair. That’s year five, patience kind of runs out. I think at the salaries they are paying these coaches now — this is not Will Muschamp specific — but at the salary you are paying in the SEC now, it is fair for these folks to say, ‘OK, we want results now.’ Alabama cycles off the schedule in 2020 but the core problem doesn’t change, which is that South Carolina is stuck geographically and otherwise right between Georgia and Clemson who are on monster rolls right now. The team that they have to beat to make every fan in their state feel good is the defending national champion. The team that they have to beat to win their division and get back to Atlanta for the second time in history is on a roll that is not quite as good as Clemson but is getting there. That’s a problem. Those guys are still around in 2020. I think that next fall (2020) you will hear a lot of, ‘Big year for Will Muschamp,’ ‘Is Will Muschamp on the hot seat?’, ‘It’s time for Will Muschamp and South Carolina to show some progress.’ Finebaum: You said some very kind things about Muschamp in terms of the infrastructure. Spurrier was a different breed. … What do people think of Will Muschamp? He was hired at the same time as Kirby Smart. They come from similar trees. The results have been dramatically different so far. Me: Nothing is really 50-50, but you’re real close to 50-50 in Columbia at this point (on Muschamp). When the news of his hiring broke, he had an uphill battle PR-wise because of what had happened at Florida. He pretty quickly climbed that hill because of the way he talked, the things he did, the fact that they won nine games in year two. He endeared himself to the South Carolina people well, but that only lasts the blink of an eye in the SEC, especially when you’ve got the Clemson problem staring you in the face. So I think that folks now have settled into sides. … They’ve settled into their camps. You’re either for Will Muschamp and you see the things I was talking about earlier or you’re against Will Muschamp and you see the reality that your two biggest rivals are beating your doors in and there doesn’t seem to be an end in sight to that.
  13. Three Gamecocks defenders who shined in the spring May 01, 2019 South Carolina football’s spring practice was the start of things, but certainly far from the end. Players will mostly have to prove their mettle in August to lock down big roles, but they can show a little something across the month of March. But that didn’t stop WIll Muschamp from picking out a trio of players who showed him a little something the last time the team took the field. He pointed out linebacker Ernest Jones and defensive tackles Rick Sandidge and Jabari Ellis as players who made “tremendous strides” in the spring. Jones didn’t have a spring at all last season, as the early enrollee had a back injury keep him out. He saw his role increase late in the season and saw a lot more work in spring. “Ernest Jones. I think his ability to — obviously, one man’s misfortune is another man’s opportunity — T.J. (Brunson) not going through spring, I think, really helped Ernest,” Muschamp said. “He had to play the Mike (linebacker). He had to make all the calls and Ernest is really smart. “I think that was really good for him, to see him step forward like that.”The coach pointed out the second-year player was tasked with many of the communication responsibilities the staff throws on its middle linebackers and he came through well. Sandidge came to Columbia as the highest-rated recruit in his class. He was thrown into the fire because of depth issues, a situation Muschamp called a bit unfair.“His play, from fall to spring practice, was drastically different,” Muschamp said. “As far as his pad-level, consistency in performance.” Sandidge made 19 tackles last season, 2 1/2 for loss. And he wasn’t the only lineman Muschamp spoke highly of. “Jabari Ellis is a guy that I think made huge strides,” Muschamp said. Ellis didn’t play much early, at least until injuries started to hit South Carolina. He made six tackles with a sack in four games. “Those would be three that just jump off the page at me,” Muschamp said.
  14. Senior LB T.J. Brunson moving to a different Position on the field? April 30, 2019 Coming out of spring practice, South Carolina football coach Will Muschamp was high on his second-year linebacker Ernest Jones. His staff had also just brought in a freshman who looks ready to do something in Derek Boykins. The only hang up is both are exclusively middle linebackers, a spot currently occupied by two-year starter T.J. Brunson, the team’s returning leading tackler. But that apparently might not be the biggest hang up. “T.J. can play both,” Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp said. “T.J. came in and played the Dime and Will for us as a freshman. T.J. understands those positions fine.” A move from that middle spot to the weak side would not be unprecedented in the program‘s recent history. Skai Moore had started in the middle for two years heading into his junior campaign. But the talent behind him had shown well, and he moved over, earning all-SEC honors as a senior. That weakside spot is currently held by rising junior Sherrod Greene, who had an up-and-down first season as a starter in 2018. There is no immediate indication of any change coming, but it is an unusual situation with a group that returns everyone but also had its share of struggles last season. The staff has never been shy about saying it will play the best players regardless of seniority, and if the situation dictates, the team has the flexibility to do some shuffling. “Sherrod could play both,” Muschamp said. “Ernest, we’re going to keep him primarily at the Mike, but you’ve got to create depth on your team, with guys being able to cross-train and play other positions.”
  15. Muschamp hoping to get these freshmen in a few weeks early April 30, 2019 The University of South Carolina’s schedule offers the particular quirk of the Maymester, a three-week period of classes between the end of the spring semester and the star of full summer classes. The Gamecocks football team is hoping to take advantage of that and get a few more players on campus a little early. USC coach Will Muschamp said the staff is working through details of possibly getting a pair of 2019 recruits on campus soon for the Maymester set to start in two weeks. “We’re still working through that right now,” Muschamp said at a Spurs Up tour stop. “There’s some possibilities there. Jammie Robinson is a possibility. We’ll kind of see. Shilo Sanders is a possibility. We haven’t finalized that yet.” Robinson is a versatile defensive back from South Georgia who committed to the Gamecocks on the February signing day. Sanders is a talented corner out of Texas and the son of Pro Football Hall of Famer Deion Sanders. Robinson is expected to help at either safety or nickel, while Sanders is a bit of a wildcard as to where he’ll end up in the secondary. Muschamp said it’s “very seldom” freshmen enroll at this juncture just because of getting semesters and graduation to line up. It’s happened with a few junior college players, including Javon Kinlaw.
  16. Linebacker rundown for 2019 April 29, 2019 • The absence of Brunson this spring allowed for sophomore Ernest Jones to get reps with the first team at middle linebacker, a position he admits requires a lot of him but that he's feeling more comfortable with now. Jones should help provide depth at a position that lacked it last season. • If there's one word that linebackers coach Coleman Hutzler harped on for his group this spring it's "consistency." Hutzler didn't mince words when he met with the media this spring and talked about challenging his group. • Senior linebacker Eldridge Thompson has yet to officially be cleared by the NCAA for his sixth season of eligibility, but the coaching staff remains confident that he has a good case to get one. • Also returning from injury is senior Danny Fennell, who missed the spring after tearing his ACL late last season. Fennell has been one of the Gamecocks' most consistent under-the-radar players during his three seasons of contributions and should have the edge to start at the SAM position, which is on the field whenever Carolina is in its base 4-3 set. • Look out for two true freshmen that the staff is high on in Derek Boykins and Jahmar Brown. Boykins, a heavy hitter who enrolled early and went through spring practice, is working at middle linebacker where he's already made his physicality known. Brown, who will enroll for the summer, is slated to play the WILL spot where he brings excellent coverage ability for a linebacker. • Junior Damani Staley and redshirt freshman Rosendo Louis, who also missed the spring with a shoulder injury, should also provide depth at the position. Staley saw his playing time increase as last season progressed. "We've just got to be more consistent as a group, that's the bottom line," he said. "We were very inconsistent [last season], as a group, as linebackers, and we've got to do that. Sherrod and T.J., they made a handful of plays and did a lot of good things for us, but at the end of the day, we were not consistent enough in playing both the run and the pass. We've got to do that. "That's been my challenge to them and our challenge to the group. We talk about that every day." • South Carolina's linebacking corps will no doubt be led by senior T.J. Brunson, who missed the spring while rehabbing a couple of different injuries, but will be back at 100 percent for fall camp. Brunson was the defense's leading tackler last season and has started every game for the last two seasons. Brunson has collected 206 career tackles including 15.0 tackles for loss and 6.0 sacks. • The Gamecock staff will look for WILL linebacker Sherrod Greene to take a big step forward in 2019. Greene was highly coveted by the staff as a recruit, quickly becoming one of their top targets at the position out of high school, and has shown flashes, but will look to become more consistent this season.
  17. Looking at the DL interior players for 2019 April 27, 2019 • Jabari Ellis, who transferred in last year from junior college, got off to a rockier start due to his late arrival and being limited with injury upon enrollment. He still played a bit last season but still was able to preserve his redshirt. He looked good in spring ball and should be in a position to help substantially this season. • True freshman Zacch Pickens played mostly inside during spring football, and while he was limited at times with a hamstring, showed the physical traits that made him a five-star recruit. As he continues to progress, he should see the field in year one. • Another newcomer, JUCO transfer Devontae Davis, can work inside or outside. He is still learning but he does have a lot of traits the staff likes. His progression this fall practice should continue. • There is more talent and more available bodies. New staff addition John Scott Jr. has seemed to garner positive reviews as well. • This unit will be bolstered tremendously by the return of Javon Kinlaw. He sat out spring football, but the Goose Creek product has certainly shown what he can do at times. Being healthy should have a big senior season, it’d be a big boost to this defense. • A couple of other very experienced players return on the interior as well. One is Kobe Smith, who’s a nose guard, and also Keir Thomas, who’s capable of playing inside and outside. Both have played a lot of football for the Gamecocks. • Sophomore Rick Sandidge had an excellent spring and should be a big factor this year at defensive tackle. He played plenty – more than expected – as a true freshman in the 2018 campaign. • Tyreek Johnson worked inside last year and sat out this spring recovering from an ACL injury. He was one of the surprises of the preseason last year prior to sustaining the knee injury. He will be one to keep An Eye on this fall. • Griffin Gentry has worked at BUCK and end during his career but played inside during spring football. • Four-star Jaquaze Sorrells, who signed with the Gamecocks in February, will be on campus this summer and participate in preseason camp later this year.
  18. Gamecocks will have to beat UNC. Would be great to have them here to highlight all the new football facilities. The other 2 games that pose a threat to taking gameday that week is: - Pitt @ Penn St. - Stanford @ UCF "I feel this game is our biggest threat and could still snatch it"
  19. Will Muschamp comments on two key aspects of his South Carolina program that have improved April 24, 2019, | SDS At this time last year, South Carolina had a ton of hype surrounding the program. A new, exciting offense was being installed in Columbia and the Gamecocks were set to return a ton of weapons on offense that left many Gamecock fans envisioning scoreboards lighting up all season. We all know that never materialized and the Gamecocks finished the season with a dud of a bowl game, losing 28-0 to Virginia. The Belk Bowl loss dropped the team to 7-6 on the season. Following those results, the hype surrounding the program is minimal exiting the spring but that may not necessarily be a bad thing as South Carolina fans found out just how much value there is in offseason hype. Looking ahead to the upcoming season, two aspects of the South Carolina program have improved since last season according to Muschamp, but neither one is going to generate much offseason hype — line of scrimmage depth and leadership on the roster. “At this time, there are some things to be excited about. The competitive depth we have on our team. We have a deeper roster than we have had before, especially on both lines of scrimmage, which excites you because I know this league very well and you have to be strong there,” Muschamp recently said in a YouTube video posted by GamecockCentral.com. “I think we have good leadership, we have three players on our team that previously in their careers have been voted team captains.” Having greater depth and improved leadership isn’t going to make for any exciting offseason hype reels but it’s the type of improvement Muschamp’s program desperately needed to make in order to push forward. If these areas are truly improved in Columbia, the Gamecocks are much more likely to exceed expectations next fall after failing to meet them in 2018. One other aspect of the team Muschamp was asked to discuss was the backup role behind Jake Bentley. The Gamecocks have two talented prospects competing for the job, which is just another example of the competitive depth Muschamp discussed in his program this offseason, as redshirt freshman Dakereon Joyner and true freshman Ryan Hilinski both looked the part this spring in camp. However, according to Muschamp, neither player has done enough at this point to be anointed the program’s backup signal caller. “There’s not enough separation from that position as far as naming a second guy at this time but I think both of them bring really good things to the table,” Muschamp noted. “I think both guys progressed really well. Dakereon from Year 1 to Year 2 and Ryan being a high school senior coming mid-year, did some really nice things.”
  20. Muschamp speaks ahead of the first Spurs Up Tour Stop (AUDIO) April 24, 2019 | By SportsTalk Radio Network Will Muschamp made his first stop along the Spurs Up Tour Tuesday night ahead of South Carolina’s baseball game against Charleston Southern in North Augusta, SC. Muschamp addressed the media and spoke about the loyalty of the Gamecock fan base, the return of wide receiver OrTre Smith, the upcoming schedule and the importance of seeing his players drafted by the NFL. LISTEN HERE WILL MUSCHAMP SPURS UP TOUR SCHEDULE
  21. Muschamp talks Gamecocks 2019 football slate April 24, 2019 South Carolina’s spring speaking tour has only started and Gamecocks head football coach Will Muschamp already is a little tired of answering questions about his team’s 2019 schedule. “It’s tough every year,” Muschamp told reporters prior to speaking the Augusta and Aiken Gamecock Clubs as part of his annual Spurs Up tour. “Our schedule is difficult every year. I don’t understand why everyone is making a big deal about it. Success to us is winning our state and winning the East. That gives you the opportunity to play in the College Football Playoff, and that’s what our expectation is every year.” When the fan portion of event began, the subject came up again. “Everybody asks me about the schedule,” said Muschamp, who spoke before the Gamecocks baseball team played Charleston Southern in SRP Park. “Hell, the schedule is hard every year. It is what it is. They are looking at their schedule saying, ‘Damn, we have to go to Williams-Brice.’ That’s what I want them saying.” Muschamp, who will speak in Columbia at Williams-Brice Stadium on Wednesday night, is really going to be tired of the subject by the time the 2019 season kicks off Aug. 31 against North Carolina at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte. South Carolina’s 2019 football schedule was ranked the second-hardest in the country by Bleacher Report. The Gamecocks play three of the nation’s top four teams — according to ESPN’s offseason Top 25 — in Clemson, Alabama and Georgia. They also play at Texas A&M and host Florida. The Gamecocks finished 7-6 last year. Muschamp is 22-17 overall and 12-12 in the SEC in three years at South Carolina. “At this time, there are some things to be excited about,” Muschamp said. “The competitive depth we have on our team. We have a deeper roster than we have had before, especially on both lines of scrimmage, which excites you. You have to be strong there. May, June and July are critical for us. You get better or worse every single day. That goes back to your leadership and your competitive depth. Guys know they have to work.” NFL Hall of Famers Ronnie Lott and Charles Haley addressed the Gamecocks in Columbia on Tuesday. “Charles Haley said it best: ‘Hoping and dreaming and wishing ain’t going to get you anywhere in life,’ ” Muschamp said. “Our guys aren’t hoping or wishing or dreaming. They are ready to get to work.” Lott had a word of advice for South Carolina quarterback Jake Bentley, Muschamp said. “Jake asked Ronnie Lott about the great quarterback-receiver combinations you’ve been against. What’s the No. 1 thing they have done well?” Muschamp said. “He said the No. 1 thing is the quarterback took care of the football, and Jake has got to be better with that.” 2020/2019/2018/2017/2016 Date Opponent Location Time 8/31 vs N. Carolina Ch., N.C. 9/7  Charleston S. Col., S.C. 9/14 Alabama Col., S.C. 9/21 at Missouri Col., Mo. 9/28 Kentucky Col., S.C. 10/5 Open date - - 10/12 at Georgia Ath., Ga. 10/19 Florida Col., S.C. 10/26 at Tenn. Knox., Tenn. 11/2 Vanderbilt Col., S.C. 11/9 Appalachian St. Col., S.C. 11/16 at Texas A&M Col.St.Tex. 11/23 Open date - - 11/30 Clemson Col., S.C.
  22. ESPN’s FPI projects South Carolina football’s win total for 2019 April 17, 2019 ESPN’s FPI metric had South Carolina football in pretty high regard. But it’s not bullish on if that will translate to a big season. The efficiency number pegs the Gamecocks as the No. 18 team in the country, a jump from No. 35 at the end of last season. But that only shakes out to 6.1 projected wins. So much has already been said about the Gamecocks’ schedule, but ESPN has it as the hardest in the country. “Difficult slates abound across the SEC -- which boasts 10 of FPI’s top 20 teams -- and the Pac-12 due to aforementioned depth,” ESPN’s Seth Walder wrote. “The teams with the 10 most difficult schedules all play in one of the two conferences. At the top, South Carolina is followed by USC, Florida, Stanford and Georgia. The Crimson Tide rank 20th in strength of schedule.” South Carolina’s schedule features three of the four most likely teams to make the playoff in Clemson, Alabama, and Georgia. The latter two are notable since only one can take a conference title. If USC were to win six games, it would mark the second season in a row in which South Carolina’s record slipped. Will Muschamp’s squad improved by three wins in each of his first two seasons. The neighborhood for the Gamecocks has grown rougher in recent years, and the once-every-6-years meeting with the Crimson Tide makes that more challenging. Clemson grew into a national power, as did Georgia. Both Florida and Texas A&M showed enough promise to be in the conversation for preseason top-10. Kentucky and Missouri have likewise been strong in recent seasons. According to an earlier version of the rankings, South Carolina is projected to have a top-15 quality offense and a defense in the top-35.
  23. ‘You can call it swagger,’ the big turnaround USC expects in 2019 April 19, 2019 THE STATE In three seasons at South Carolina, Will Muschamp and Travaris Robinson haven’t fielded a defense that finished ranked in the top six in the SEC. Muschamp was hired as the Gamecocks head coach, and in turn hired Robinson as his defensive coordinator, in 2015 in part because the team’s defense had ceased to exist as a deterrent, and both coaches have a track record of putting very good defenses on the field. They haven’t done that yet at South Carolina, but one of the behind-the-scenes stories from spring practice this year is that they think they might be able to this year. Neither Muschamp nor Robinson has said as much publicly but they’ve said enough to show they’ve quietly got high hopes for this group, and South Carolina’s offensive players can see that. “Most definitely,” wide receiver Bryan Edwards said. “The defense just looks really good honestly. They play with confidence. They create turnovers. They are running to the ball. They play with excitement, they play with urgency. We have a really good defense in my opinion.” The Gamecocks were 12th in the SEC in total defense last year, allowing 424.4 yards per game, and 11th in scoring defense, allowing 27.2 points per game. Even considering the daunting 2019 schedule, everyone involved with South Carolina’s defense seems to believe it will be significantly better this fall. “You can definitely see it, and I think it starts with guys on the (secondary) and kind of trickles its way through, down to the d-line,” quarterback Jake Bentley said. “I think everyone on defense has that confidence about them that they want to go win every play. That’s going to make our whole team better. It definitely makes us a lot better on offense.” The defense often got the better of the offense throughout spring, several offensive players said, and they weren’t shy about letting their teammates know about it. “When one unit is struggling and the other is flourishing, it encourages you to pick it up,” Edwards said. “You see one unit having fun, it makes you want to get back in your playbook and tighten up the things you need to do to make our offense look better. When you see the defense getting riled up and making plays, it frustrates you so you want to get out there and make plays. It kind of puts that little oomph in your step to say, let’s get it done and get this right.” Bentley credited the attitudes of starting cornerbacks Jaycee Horn and Isreal Mukuamu for the defensive resurgence. “Jaycee and Israel want me to throw it at them on every play,” Bentley said. The Gamecocks also except to have a healthy D.J. Wonnum, Javon Kinlaw, T.J. Brunson and Jamyest Williams in 2019, which should help a defense that struggled with depth a year ago. “You can call it swagger, you can call it what you want,” defensive ends coach Mike Peterson said. “When you get some guys who are playing with a lot of confidence, you get positive things going and your whole organization starts to change, and I think that’s where we are at. Guys are playing with confidence. We have some guys who played ball last year and they know what to do.”
  24. Post-spring report card: What Gamecocks do well, need to do better April 15, 2019, | SDS Some fresh faces emerged for South Carolina this spring, and at more than one position, the coaching staff is pleased with the talented depth at hand. Entering Will Muschamp’s fourth season in Columbia, the Gamecocks return 16 starters and bring in two blue-chip recruits who were ranked higher than any recruit since the 11-win golden days under Steve Spurrier. Muschamp will take that roster into a difficult schedule against 6 opponents that finished in the Associated Press top 16. Here is a post-spring report card for a program that finished fourth in the SEC East in 2018: QB situation Between Jake Bentley’s experience, and the budding talent of Dakereon Joyner and Ryan Hilinski, there are plenty of options. Now it’s up to the coaching staff to decide the best way to deploy that talent. Not to mention, how the younger QBs can contribute in special situations. The modern challenge is keeping everyone happy after the competition ends and the season begins. Muschamp and his staff have yet to face this kind of situation at South Carolina. In many ways, Bentley puts Muschamp at ease with his leadership, experience, knowledge of the playbook and ability to make key throws. However, interceptions have continually plagued Bentley’s growth into the elite category of SEC quarterbacks. By Oct. 1, the Gamecocks could be 4-1, but that’s largely dependent upon quarterback play and turnovers. Grade: B Running game Kevin Harris was a bruising bright spot for the Gamecocks this spring as carries opened up following the transfer of Ty’Son Williams and a groin injury to Rico Dowdle, which sidelined him. The asterisk for the Gamecocks is Muschamp has said A.J. Turner and Mon Denson would be the top two backs entering the fall, but Turner played defensive back throughout the spring. Denson was South Carolina’s second-best runner last season, as he collected 432 yards on 80 carries as he made two starts in the revolving door of a backfield. Overall, it’s another area that seems to be poised for a breakout season, but too often in recent years has struggled to reach a higher gear. The Gamecocks haven’t finished better than 10th in the SEC in rushing since 2014, when they ranked No. 9. They were No. 13, No. 12 and No. 12 in Muschamp’s first three seasons, respectively. Dowdle is getting another crack at being a feature back, something he had the chance to grab in 2016 when he had 4 touchdowns and two 100-yard games in a month. However, Dowdle has struggled to find consistency atop the depth chart and on the field. Grade: C Passing game (including WRs/TEs) Jay Urich was arguably the brightest breakout performer across the roster. His long touchdown and versatility in the Garnet and Black Game was something not many expected. Add Urich to a veteran group headlined by Bryan Edwards and Shi Smith, and the Gamecocks have one of the best wide receiving corps in the SEC. Edwards will assume the Deebo Samuel leadership role, while Smith is looking to build on the 74 passes for 1,082 yards and 7 touchdowns in his first two seasons. Kiel Pollard and Kyle Markway are experienced tight ends capable of making one or two key catches per game. This unit is a team strength. Grade: A Offensive line The Gamecocks have a solid starting group, including several players, such as Donell Stanley, Sadarius Hutcherson and Dylan Wonnum with experience. However, depth is somewhat of a concern as the incoming freshmen will likely need to contribute, at least as backups. One question is at center where Hank Manos, Eric Douglas and former walk-on Chandler Farrell are competing. Grade: B- Run defense This area might be the most encouraging for Muschamp, purely from a depth standpoint. Of course, there’s 5-star Zacch Pickens, but some of Muschamp’s first comments following the spring game were about the number of athletic bodies moving in and out. Dowdle is getting another crack at being a feature back, something he had the chance to grab in 2016 when he had 4 touchdowns and two 100-yard games in a month. However, Dowdle has struggled to find consistency atop the depth chart and on the field. Grade: C Passing game (including WRs/TEs) Jay Urich was arguably the brightest breakout performer across the roster. His long touchdown and versatility in the Garnet and Black Game was something not many expected. Add Urich to a veteran group headlined by Bryan Edwards and Shi Smith, and the Gamecocks have one of the best wide receiving corps in the SEC. Edwards will assume the Deebo Samuel leadership role, while Smith is looking to build on the 74 passes for 1,082 yards and 7 touchdowns in his first two seasons. Kiel Pollard and Kyle Markway are experienced tight ends capable of making one or two key catches per game. This unit is a team strength. Grade: A Offensive line The Gamecocks have a solid starting group, including several players, such as Donell Stanley, Sadarius Hutcherson and Dylan Wonnum with experience. However, depth is somewhat of a concern as the incoming freshmen will likely need to contribute, at least as backups. One question is at center where Hank Manos, Eric Douglas and former walk-on Chandler Farrell are competing. Grade: B- Run defense This area might be the most encouraging for Muschamp, purely from a depth standpoint. Of course, there’s 5-star Zacch Pickens, but some of Muschamp’s first comments following the spring game were about the number of athletic bodies moving in and out. SDS YEAR TOP RUSHER YARDS/TDS TDS TEAM YPG (SEC RANK) 2018 Rico Dowdle 654 4 152.8 (12) 2017 A.J. Turner 517 3 122.2 (12) 2016 Rico Dowdle 714 6 134.4 (13) 2015 Brandon Wilds 567 3 154.7 (10) 2014 Mike Davis 927 9 161 (9) 2013 Mike Davis 1,134 11 198.5 (6)
  25. Spring review: Offensive tackles rundown FROM GAMECOCKCENTRAL South Carolina put a bow on spring football last Saturday with the Garnet & Black Game inside Williams-Brice Stadium. In this series, GamecockCentral.com takes a look at where things stand at each position now that spring ball is over. Today focuses on the offensive tackles. • While it appeared that left tackle may be a position that was going to feature a spring position battle, Sadarius Hutcherson locked down the first-team spot pretty early in camp and never looked back, solidifying the position for this season. Hutcherson came to South Carolina as a tackle, but was a starter at guard last season, before moving back to left tackle this spring. • Sophomore Dylan Wonnum, a former four-star recruit, took over as the Gamecocks' starting right tackle midway through the 2018 season and returns as the starter there this season. • Hutcherson played a team-high 896 snaps on offense last season.Wonnum played 506, giving the Gamecocks two experienced starters at tackle. But there's virtually no experienced depth behind them, making it one of the key positions on the roster that the Gamecocks can't afford injuries. • Freshman early enrollee Jaylen Nichols caught the attention of head coach Will Muschamp and earned the praise of offensive line coach Eric Wolford this spring. He's big and athletic at 6-foot-5, 315-pounds. While Nichols, like most freshmen at the position, still has plenty to learn, he could be forced into action this season. He worked as the backup right tackle in the spring game. • Redshirt sophomore Jordon Carty has yet to see action in his career but offers massive potential. The 6-foot-7, 327-pounder was banged up at times this spring but worked with the second team at left tackle in the spring game. • Redshirt sophomore Eric Douglas could be a wild card at tackle. A sharp, versatile player, Douglas spent time this spring at center, guard, and tackle, filling in at center during the spring game due to injuries to Hank Manos and Chandler Farrell. Douglas could serve the all-important role of swingman this year, providing depth at every spot on the O-line. • Keep an eye on freshman offensive lineman Jakai Moore this fall. Moore isn't on campus yet, but has similar athleticism to Nichols and could factor into the offensive tackle conversation as the season progresses.
×
×
  • Create New...