Jump to content
Gamecock Fanatics

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'South Carolina'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • GameCock Fanatics
    • Announcements & Discussions/Suggestions Here
    • VIP Zone
    • New Member Introductions / Happy Birthday Greetings
  • Gamecock Sports
    • Gamecock Pigskin
    • Hoops Central
    • Yardcock Baseball
    • Football Recruiting News
    • Basketball Recruiting News
    • Baseball Recruiting News
    • Non-Revenue Sports
    • Gamecock Multimedia
    • Gamecock Fanatics Fan Poll
    • Gamecock & SEC Media: Gamecock & SEC Podcast
  • General Sports
    • GamecockFantics "All Sports News"
    • High School Sports
    • Rival-Pit
    • Locker Room
    • Talking SEC Sports
  • Community
    • The Photoshop Shop Room
    • Technical Chat
    • General Chat
    • The Chapel
    • Political Forum
    • GCF Swap Shop Forum
    • Fanatics Babes
    • Hall of Fame Threads
    • Test, Help And Techie Forum
  • FeatheredCocks I Bleed Garnet Club's Who is going to the first game this seson

Categories

  • Football
  • Basketball
  • Baseball
  • Recruiting
  • Other Sports
  • South Carolina News

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Gamecock Football Videos
  • Gamecock Basketball Videos
  • Gamecock Baseball Videos
  • Gamecock Other Sports Videos
  • GamecockFanatics Members Non-Sports Videos

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 1,317 results

  1. Deion Sanders, DT Cromer see friendship come full circle with Gamecock connection May 26, 2019, | THE STATE D.T. Cromer has put up Deion Sanders in his house, and now he can extend the same offer to Sanders’ son Shilo thanks to South Carolina football. Cromer, who played baseball at Lexington High School and then USC, and Deion Sanders were teammates with the Cincinnati Reds in 2001. It was the last season of Major League Baseball for each, but it started a friendship between the two that came full circle this year when Shilo Sanders signed to play defensive back for the Gamecocks. That means Shilo Sanders and Cromer’s daughter Ashlyn Cromer will both be in Williams-Brice Stadium on Saturdays this fall. Ashlyn is a sophomore cheerleader for the Gamecocks. It won’t be the first time she and Shilo been around each other. That was 18 years ago, when their parents were friends and traveling partners. “Life is crazy to think that 18 years have passed and our kids used to play together,” D.T. said. “Our wives ended up getting to be pretty close and they went to games together. I can remember at some point Ashlyn and Shilo in their car seats next to each other with the wives going on a road trip.” When Cromer saw that Shilo , who played high school football in Cedar Hill, Texas, was considering playing football at South Carolina, he reached out to his old teammate. “When he committed, I sent him a text and said I still had the room ready for him if he wanted to come by,” Cromer said. That’s a reference to a night Cromer picked Sanders up late at the airport in Cincinnati and let him crash at his house. “He always brings up a funny story that I made him sleep on my couch in my apartment. He said, ‘Crom Daddy put me on the couch and fed me,’ ” Cromer said, “but I don’t think we put him on the couch. I think we put him in the guest bedroom.” Either way, Cromer has now extended the offer to Shilo, who enrolled at South Carolina ahead of this summer. On May 14, Cromer gave Shilo a ride to South Carolina’s final home baseball game. “He reached out and texted me so I went by and picked him up and his roommates up,” Cromer said. “I think he has interest in eventually trying to play baseball here so he was excited to go see the baseball field, and it was the first time (Shilo and Ashlyn) got to catch up so it was a lot of fun.” Deion Sanders could not be reached for comment, but he did tweet a picture of his son and Ashlyn Cromer, calling D.T. Cromer “my dear friend and former teammate.” “I knew we played when we were little and my parents would hang out together,” Ashlyn Cromer said. Ashlyn and Shilo talked last season in Williams-Brice during Sanders’ official visit to South Carolina. “He was asking a bunch of questions about Carolina and classes,” Ashlyn said. “I didn’t know where he was going to choose so I was staying neutral through the whole process, but I told him I’d always show him around if I told him I’m always there for him and I’ll show him around if I ever need to and introduce him to all my friends.” Shilo was an Under Armour All-American at Trinity Christian High School, where he had five interceptions, 199 receiving yards and two kickoff returns for touchdowns as a senior. He could not comment for this article because USC football freshmen aren’t allowed to do media interviews. “He says he loves it here so much,” Ashlyn said. “I asked him if he was getting homesick, and he said, ‘No, I love it here.’ He doesn’t ever want to leave.” Having a support system already in place has helped. The USC connection will grow by one next year because D.T.’s son David will join the Gamecocks baseball team. “I am happy that I am here because Deion knows he has a good friend here that if Shilo needs anything he can reach out,” D.T. Cromer said. “He knows he’s got somebody here to help look out for him. It’s just neat.” D.T. Cromer and Deion Sanders, who was famous for his two-sport success and flashy nicknameslike Prime Time and Neon Deion, struck up a friendship almost accidentally. “One day, I was sitting on the bus and had a seat beside me and he sat down beside me and started talking. It was kind of surreal. From that point, we just kind of hit it off,” Cromer said. “He’s probably one of the best good people I have met in my life. He’s Prime Time, but as a teammate and a friend they don’t come any better. Anybody who will get to meet him will be blessed. If there is a Hall of Fame of people, in God’s eyes he is in it.”
  2. Gamecock Junior Paul Jubb competed in the NCAA Men's Singles championship Saturday against top-seeded Nuno Borges of Mississippi State. Borges, a senior, came into the championship match on a 31-match win streak, and a 17-set win streak (collegiate singles tennis plays 2 out of 3 sets per match). Jubb - the 4th Seed in the Tournament, had played Borges twice before, losing both matches in three sets. Today, Jubb prevented the match with Borges from being the third straight match to go three sets, by storming the 2nd-set tiebreak 7-2 to win in straight sets, 6-3, 7-6 (7-2), to win the first singles tennis championship for either men's or women's programs at South Carolina! By winning the singles title today, Jubb includes his name with such past winners as Arthur Ashe, Stan Smith, Jimmy Connors, and John McEnroe. Well done, Paul!!
  3. MAY 23, 2019 by THESPURSUPSHOW TSUS Ep. 100 | Yardcocks Season Ends, Athlon Pre-Season Magazine + Anthony Wright Chris breaks down the Gamecocks loss to LSU in the SEC Tournament and gives his thoughts on the 2019 season as a whole. He also discusses what Mark Kingston and company need to focus on this off-season as the look to bounce back next spring. There are officially 100 days to kickoff and that means “pre-season football magazine season” is in full effect. Chris dives into Athlon’s CFB preview magazine and gives his thoughts on how Athlon views South Carolina’s chances in 2019. Finally, former Gamecocks QB and Super Bowl Champion Anthony Wright joins the show to chat about his time at USC, feeling under appreciated, pushing through multiple injuries, being a starting QB in the NFL and more. iTunes Spotify Google Play Stitcher Buzzsprout
  4. Gamecocks Set New Standard in the Classroom 5/23/2019 | Academics The University of South Carolina Athletics Department concluded the spring 2019 semester with a departmental GPA of 3.338. It marks the department's highest GPA in history and the 25th-consecutive semester for a departmental GPA above 3.0. The previous high was 3.335, set in the fall of 2018. Seventeen of the 18 teams earned a 3.0 or better GPA during the spring semester. (CLICK TO VIEW)
  5. Paul Finebaum speaks up about how warm he thinks Will Muschamp’s seat should be May 14, 2019 The balance of Will Muschamp’s tenure at South Carolina has been by most measures more good than bad. His first two seasons saw jumps of three wins, each outperforming preseason expectations. His third season saw a failure to meet lofty preseason expectations and didn’t meet internal standards (he’s said this several times). Now his Gamecocks face likely the hardest schedule in the country next season. That confluence of event caught the attention of SEC Network analyst and host Paul Finebaum, who had some harsh words about the USC’s situation. “The seat probably should be (hot), but I’m not sure it is,” Finebaum said The Roundtable on WJOX FM in Birmingham. “I say this only because I’ve talked to the president of South Carolina and the athletic director recently and they have just put up this stiff upper lip about Will Muschamp. I think it would take an absolute disaster of a season to unload him because they’re now blaming Spurrier for everything that has gone wrong in Will Muschamp’s tenure. Ray Tanner the other day said, ‘We all love coach Spurrier, but he didn’t leave the program, I’m paraphrasing, in great shape from a recruiting standpoint.’” Spurrier left the team halfway through a 3-9 campaign and has said multiple times he left a bad situation behind. He did leave a few future NFL players like Deebo Samuel, Hayden Hurst, Chris Lammons and Taylor Stallworth, but the staff has worked with constant scarcity at the front and back ends of the defense. It’s also worth noting, the expectations for 2018 were built partially on a softer schedule heavy on teams in transition. Two of those teams, Florida and Texas A&M, finished No. 7 and No. 17 respectively. Those projections had USC shaking off a losing streak against Kentucky, and instead the Wildcats made the jump to top-12 team. Per Bill Connolly’s S&P+, the Gamecocks had the ninth-hardest schedule in the country. Finebaum in turn invoked Georgia, a team coming off 19 wins in two seasons in the heart of one of the most talent-rich states in the country, and Kirby Smart as a comparison. “I think that’s ridiculous at this point,” Finebaum said, speaking of the references to what Spurrier left. “We all know Muschamp and Kirby Smart have been at their program for the same exact time. One was left in better shape, but when you’re in Year 4, you really ought to just knock off on the excuses. I thought last year was certainly under-performing and the schedule this year is extremely difficult. … I don’t think he’s going to lose his job this year. I think South Carolina people are more setting it up for the next year if things go haywire.”
  6. Muschamp can’t hit the road recruiting this time of year. But he’s plenty busy helping May 10, 2019, | THE STATE SUMTE -Will Muschamp wishes he was in the thick of recruiting right now. South Carolina’s football head coach has sent his assistants on the road, talking to high school coaches, teachers and administrators, turning over every rock for talent in the Southeast and beyond. But he can’t get in on the fun. As a head coach, he’s not allowed on the road because of a rule colloquially named after his former boss Nick Saban. “I think it’s ridiculous that we can’t go out recruiting as head coaches,” Muschamp said. “I would love to evaluate.” So instead, he’s the traffic control man, running and organizing the effort from a central location and doing a little more to fill the days. “I’m in the office with Matt Lindsey evaluating guys that they’re calling in on, shifting our board,” Muschamp said. “Constantly working through that. We’re doing some opponent study right now, as far as those things are concerned, just to have some notes ready for the guys (when they) get off the road.” He said much of the value of these stops for his coaches is learning about players’ practice ethic, checking off size and speed questions to confirm what’s seen on film, and perhaps as important, the character side of things. He pointed out, this semester is often when kids’ academic situations come into focus. The spring also means trips to Gamecock Clubs in the state and beyond, putting in the leg work for fan relations. He laid out a little of what goes on not only this month, but heading into the rest of the offseason. -Assistants on the road through the end of May, evaluating players -June is heavy on on-campus camps. These are spots where coaches can work with players in a hands-on way. Unlike in past years, this will be stretched to three weeks instead of crammed into two. Muschamp said those give an early taste of how a player will function working under a particular coach. -End of June, early July brings a short break. -Then back to breaking down the first three opponents and planning out August camp install with SEC Media Days coming on July 17.
  7. Twelve sports post perfect APR scores By JOHN WHITTLE All of the University of South Carolina's countable intercollegiate sports posted a multi-year score of 950 or better for the eighth-consecutive year, according to the Academic Progress Rate (APR) statistics that were released today. Fifteen sports recorded multi-year APR scores of 980 or better. "Our student-athletes work extremely hard, not only in their respective sports, but also in the classroom," said Athletics Director Ray Tanner. "These APR numbers are indicative of the commitment made by the student-athletes, as well as our coaches and academic support staff. I'm thrilled to see our student-athletes have continued success both on and off the field." FULL STORY: https://247sports.com/college/south-carolina/Article/South-Carolina-Gamecocks-athletics-APR-2017-18-131875205/
  8. Tanner looking into Hall of Fame-type space By JOHN WHITTLE May 6, 2019 The South Carolina athletics department is making a concerted effort to honor past student-athletes by retiring jerseys of those who were at the top of their sport at the school. At some point, not only will their achievements be highlighted at the venues where they competed, there will be a central shrine for the top players in Gamecocks history. FULL STORY: https://247sports.com/college/south-carolina/Article/South-Carolina-Gamecocks-athletics-Hall-of-Fame-building-131815928/
  9. How good is the South Carolina job? Here’s one national take May 06, 2019 If there is an offseason anymore in college football, it’s May. Spring practice is in the books, and offseason programs won’t begin until summer school sessions start in June. That makes it the perfect month for debates like these: What’s the best job in college football? Athlon Sports has decided to make a list of all 130. South Carolina comes in at No. 23. “In a vacuum, South Carolina offers just about everything a coach needs to win at the highest level,” according to the list. It goes on to point out that the Gamecocks do not exist in a vacuum, which is clear from the fact that Tennessee, Auburn, Texas A&M, LSU, Florida, Alabama and Georgia all are ranked higher than South Carolina. The Bulldogs, USC’s chief division rival, is ranked No. 1 in the country. “Perhaps no job in the country offers the best of every world like Georgia — great recruiting base, great place to live, great fan base … you get the point,” according to the list. (If you’re interested in more of their thoughts on this subject, they have devoted an entire podcast to it here.) Gamecocks fans are likely to believe their program should rank higher on the list. What is inarguable is that South Carolina is higher now than it was just 10 years ago, and significantly so. In addition to Steve Spurrier proving that a trip to the conference title game was possible, the school has completed a $15 million indoor practice facility and $50 million football operations building in that time and will soon start on $22 million of stadium renovations. All of that certainly is worth a Top 25 ranking. At least in May. Will Muschamp is entering his fourth season at South Carolina. He is 22-17 overall and has set the record for wins by a Gamecocks head coach in his first three seasons.
  10. He cut his Gamecocks football career short. Something more important called him home April 30, 2019, The State Will Putnam stood at an inflection point in life out in front of Colonial Life Arena. He posed by the venue’s fountain with a pair of former South Carolina football teammates and all three’s significant others. They toasted the degrees they’ll be given this week. Behind one of the camera phones taking pictures: Putnam’s mother, Christie. This past spring, his name disappeared off the Gamecocks roster. That isn’t uncommon in the flow of an offseason, especially a few years into a career when a player doesn’t see the field much. But he had a reason he was capping his college football and academic career at three years. His mother is sick — cancer — and while a football team is a family of sorts, his real family meant moving on from that, something not lost on his mother. “It’s amazing,” Christie Putnam said. “It’s heart-stopping, heartwarming. To have such a big kid who is such a rough guy out on the field but truly just cares about people in general and not just me. To know that I have Stage 4 cancer and will never be done with it, but that he’s willing to kind of cut his social life short and come hang with his mom is pretty dang cool.” Will Putnam stood at an inflection point in life out in front of Colonial Life Arena. He posed by the venue’s fountain with a pair of former South Carolina football teammates and all three’s significant others. They toasted the degrees they’ll be given this week. Behind one of the camera phones taking pictures: Putnam’s mother, Christie. This past spring, his name disappeared off the Gamecocks roster. That isn’t uncommon in the flow of an offseason, especially a few years into a career when a player doesn’t see the field much. But he had a reason he was capping his college football and academic career at three years. His mother is sick — cancer — and while a football team is a family of sorts, his real family meant moving on from that, something not lost on his mother. “It’s amazing,” Christie Putnam said. “It’s heart-stopping, heartwarming. To have such a big kid who is such a rough guy out on the field but truly just cares about people in general and not just me. To know that I have Stage 4 cancer and will never be done with it, but that he’s willing to kind of cut his social life short and come hang with his mom is pretty dang cool.”
  11. USC signs off on new contracts for Ray Tanner, football assistants April 29, 2019 South Carolina athletics director Ray Tanner received a two-year contract extension on Monday that will keep him with the Gamecocks until at least the summer of 2024. Tanner, who makes $900,000 annually, previously had a deal that ended in 2022. The university’s board of trustees unanimously approved the new deal in a meeting Monday. Assistant football coaches Bobby Bentley, Coleman Hutzler, Mike Peterson and Jeff Dillman also received one-year extensions through May 31, 2020. The coaches did not receive raises. Men’s basketball assistant coaches Chuck Martin and Perry Clark and women’s basketball assistant Lisa Boyer also received one-year contract extensions through 2020. In December, the board of trustees approved salaries of $1.2 million for defensive coordinator Travaris Robinson, $1 million for offensive coordinator Bryan McClendon and $700,000 for quarterbacks coach Dan Werner. Head coach Will Muschamp also got a one-year extension at that time, pushing his deal through the 2024 season. Muschamp was paid $4.2 million in 2018 and receives annual incremental raises to $5.4 million 2024. In January, offensive line coach Eric Wolford received a raise to $700,000 annually and assistant coaches Thomas Brown (running backs) and John Scott Jr. (defensive line) were added to the staff at annual salaries of $300,000 and $435,000 respectively.
  12. Williams-Brice renovations Phase II BOT approves April 29, 2019 September approval studies were done to move into Phase II approvals, which were put in front of the university’s Board of Trustees on Monday. The BOT gave its approval of a total projected budget of $22.5 million funded with $21 million of Athletic Revenue Bonds and $1.5 million of Private Funds. Plans were shown for renovations to the south, east and west sides of the stadium that are expected to be completed by the start of the 2020 season Williams-Brice Stadium 2020 Project Website 4 key areas marked to improve William Brice Included in the project in the southwest corner of the stadium will be new loge box seating that will offer 33 boxes with four seats per box for a total of 132 seats with “Excellent views of the field and the video scoreboard. Access is provided from the 2001 Club with stairs and a new elevator.” The '2001 Club' will be a luxury, two-level air-conditioned club space that accommodates loge patrons and an additional 300 more passes that will provide the purchaser access to bar and concessions and "spectacular views of the Gamecocks running by and entering the field during the 2001 ceremony," according to the release. The second floor of the Crews Building will be partially gutted and renovated to create a large conditioned club space while maintaining two tiered auditoriums for fans to view games on a large screen. The concourse, the Crews first and second floor, can accommodate 3,500 fans in sections 11-13. These two floors used to house the football team’s weight room and team meeting rooms prior to building the Cyndi and Kenneth Long Famliy Football Operations Center. On the west side of the stadium improvements to the 100-level will renovate and exapand a lounge area to become a 9,000-square foot air-conditioned club area positioned behind seconds 101-105. New restrooms and concession stands are provided. Fans seated in sections 101-109 will have access to this space and will provide a view out to Bluff Road and overlook Gamecock Park, which in the back houses the football operations center, practice fields and Jerri and Steve Spurrier Indoor Practice Facility. On the east side in sections 401-412, seating will be reconfigured to include new loge boxes, "much-needed seating for disabled fans and two ‘super vomitories’ below to directly access the club space. The club will reduce fan congestions on the upper concourse benefiting thousands of fans in the upper stands."
  13. Steve Spurrier on his final season at South Carolina: 'I deserve all the criticism they want to throw at me April 25, 2019 | SDS Without a doubt, Steve Spurrier will go down as one of the best coaches in the history of the Southeastern Conference. Be that as it may, some fans will never get over how he left South Carolina as the former Gamecock coach led the team to a disappointing 2-4 start before leaving midseason. South Carolina actually won its first game without Spurrier but finished the season 3-9 after the leader of the program quit on the Gamecocks after six games. During his appearance at the Midlands edition of South Carolina’s offseason Spurs Up Tour, Mike Gillespie of ABC Columbia caught up with Spurrier to get his thoughts on his final season leading the Gamecocks. The way Spurrier sees it, he deserves all the blame he gets for the disastrous ending of his SEC coaching career and for letting the program slip so far in his final season. “I deserve all the criticism they want to throw at me that last year, I should have let one or two coaches go because I brought some new ones in but I kept them – I did a lot of things bad,” Spurrier said. “Delegated too much to the offensive coaches… It was the worst attitude of ’bout any team I’ve ever had, and I’m the head coach, so I’m responsible. “They can criticize me all they want, I’ve had enough praise to offset that.” You can view a video of Spurrier sharing his response below:
  14. According to the Post and Courier, the four candidates are: John Applegate, the University of Indiana’s executive vice president for academic affairs; Robert Caslen Jr., the senior counsel to the president of University of Central Florida; William Tate, the vice president of graduate education at Washington University in St. Louis and Joseph Walsh, the vice president for research at Northwestern University.
  15. What South Carolina’s new JUCO addition showed the Gamecocks this spring April 16, 2019 THE STATE South Carolina defensive lineman Rick Sandidge is in a confident mood about how deep the Gamecocks will be up front. “We’re going to be thick,” the sophomore said. The group has a batch of veterans, four blue-chip underclassmen and a coaching staff that believes the Gamecocks can never have enough depth. And joining that group is 6-foot-4, 280-pound junior college lineman Devontae Davis, who has to weather the transition from that level to the SEC as he hopes to carve out a role. He joined the team last December, going through a few pre-bowl practices, and has been in the mix all spring. “Devonte has shown some flashes,” lineman Jabari Ellis, who redshirted after joining the team from junior college, said. “But just like how it was for me, it’s a learning process. Nobody really comes in and dominates from the jump. “He’s getting it through. He’s looking real good.” Davis, a Silver Bluff High School product, posted 30 tackles, 10 for loss, and four sacks in 10 junior college games last season. He was a three-star prospect out of Georgia Military College and played one season with Ellis. South Carolina tested all its depth last season, after a rash of injuries meant 15 defensive linemen registered at least four tackles. Many of those players come back, so it will take work for anyone to get snaps. But Davis has potential. “He can ball,” linebacker Sherrod Greene said. “He just has to catch up on the plays, memorize the plays because you know he’s new. I like his game. I expect a lot from him.” The Gamecocks have seen a fair amount of production from the smaller group of junior college players they’ve added the past few years: CB Jamarcus King: Two-year starter DB Steven Montac: 20 starts in 33 games DT Javon Kinlaw: Quickly forced his way into the lineup, made 22 starts in 25 healthy games DB Keisean Nixon: Started 11 games last season after playing mostly special teams in 2017 OT Dennis Daley: Started 23 of his final 24 games LB Eldridge Thompson: Played in 12 games his first year, missed most of last season with a shoulder injury Beyond them, Ellis has had his smaller role and Kaleb Chalmers didn’t play a game in his one year. Ellis and Davis obviously have ties, both coming from South Carolina and playing together in Milledgeville, Georgia‎. But the older lineman didn’t necessarily take steps to provide hands-on guidance. He instead learned from another veteran the best course for Davis. “When I came in, Javon Kinlaw, me and him have known each other since high school,” Ellis said. “So he kind of like let me be. He was like, ‘It takes time, you’re going to get it.’ So I kind of did the same thing.”
  16. Ryan Hilinski, Gamecock teammate share difficult moments with youth in Columbia April 11, 2019 THE STATE Across the span of less than an hour, people saw two very different sides of South Carolina freshman quarterback Ryan Hilinski. At one point Wednesday night in Columbia’s Busby Street Community Center, Hilinski was sharing some details from the most difficult parts of his life with a decent-sized crowd, mostly young people. Soon after, when a question about football came up, he called an impromptu gathering of kids in the room to come up front, turn to a USC camera person and lead a cheer asking Will Muschamp and Harris Pastides for football tickets. He was there as part of a symposium for National Youth Violence Prevention Week, an event with the theme “What I Want to Say Is.” The topics discussed ranged from bullying to sex trafficking to depression, a topic Hilinski touched on. His brother Tyler killed himself in January of 2018. The family had little sense something was amiss, and since then, he’s been vocal about issues of mental health (his family started a foundation called Hilinski’s Hope). So that’s how Ryan Hilinski came to be sitting alongside three police officers, two experts in human trafficking and domestic violence and teammate Spencer Eason-Riddle, a member of the Gamecocks who volunteers often. Hilinski started by speaking about the death of his brother and not knowing what precipitated it. He shared several philosophies about the way people show themselves to the world, hold back themselves and what they’re going through on the inside. “That’s something that you’ve got to take care of first and foremost,” Hilinski said. “That’s something that matters the most to you and that you can only alter and you can only take care of. “We can get through this life together as long as we have each other and you have yourself.” Hilinski also talked about some of the hardest moments, right after his brother’s suicide when he let his relationship with his parents grow distant. His family has moved to Columbia with him, partly so that they’ll never be apart after football sent his two older brothers great distances from their home in California. But for a stretch, the family was in disarray. “I didn’t talk to my parents for two months,” Hilinski said, noting he mostly ordered food and hardly left his room for a month. “We didn’t know what was going on. We were in shock. We didn’t know what to do. That all could’ve been prevented if we just talked to each other. If we just mentioned, ‘Hey, how’s your day going?’ Stuff like that. “Your family is your No. 1 resource.” He was explaining this to a group of kids, imploring them to trust and stay close to their parents (“they know best”). He said he took his own for granted and now considers them the strongest people he knows. He also dropped a piece of advice. “Be yourself,” Hilinski said. “Everybody else is taken. Be you because that’s all that matters.” Eason-Riddle spoke about bullying and getting through the difficult parts of youth. He said Marcus Lattimore approached him about doing it, and the public speaking aspect of it was something different. “I’ve never really done the panel stuff before and talked about really important issues that are really prevalent in any community,” Eason-Riddle said. “It’s important to take these opportunities as they come and be a part of being a role model and someone these kids can look up to.”
  17. walk-on Darius Douglas has put his name in the transfer portal April 10, 2019 South Carolina might have at least one quarterback moving on this offseason. A school spokesperson confirmed walk-on Darius Douglas has put his name in the transfer portal. That doesn’t guarantee he’ll leave, but other coaches can reach out and contact him. Douglas has been on the roster since 2017 and came to USC out of Berkeley High School near Charleston. When Douglas signed, he’d considered smaller schools, but wanted to take a run at a big school. He had an offer from S.C. State and interest from N.C. A&T and Presbyterian out of high school, but South Carolina caught his attention the summer before his senior year and the walk-on route became what he wanted. In two seasons in Columbia, Douglas was on the scout team and sometimes helped out at running back in drills. He has not seen any game action.
  18. Ryan Hilinski will be South Carolina’s backup quarterback. Here’s why April 07, 2019 THE STATE South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp did not name a backup quarterback after the Gamecocks’ spring game on Saturday. He (and offensive coordinator Bryan McClendon) did that during the game, even if it wasn’t their intention. Spring game statistics are worse than meaningless. They are often liars, but here are the numbers from South Carolina’s freshman quarterbacks anyway: 24-of-36 passing for 206 yards for early enrollee freshman Ryan Hilinski, and 10-of-23 passing for one touchdown and one interception for redshirt freshman Dakereon Joyner. What mattered in the 28-16 victory for the Garnet team in Williams-Brice Stadium was how those statistics were compiled in the first half. With Hilinski in, the Gamecocks’ offense looked like it will look with starter Jake Bentley at the helm this fall. South Carolina didn’t call a run play until Hilinski’s 20th snap of the spring game. The offense moved quickly, if not always effectively, alternating screens and slants with the occasional deep ball. On Joyner’s first 20 snaps, the Gamecocks threw the ball eight times. A very effective offense could be built around Joyner’s generous talents. He clearly is a dynamic threat with the ball in his hands. He rushed for 60 yards Saturday. He threw a beautiful pass for a 25-yard gain to Kiel Pollard on fourth-and-10. He led the first touchdown drive of the game. But the Gamecocks already have built a different kind of offense under McClendon, who is entering his second year as offensive coordinator, and it looks like the one Hilinski was running Saturday afternoon. “Dakereon, to really see him grow from last year until now, he’s doing real well. He’s throwing the ball well,” senior running back A.J. Turner said. “Ryan, I feel like he’s more of a stay-in-the-pocket passer, but he definitely drops dimes.” The nation’s No. 2 pro-style high school quarterback last year coming out of Orange, California, Hilinski completed eight of his first nine passes. He was far from perfect, panicking the first time he saw a free rusher and floating several passes, but those things can be fixed with time and experience. Hilinski clearly looked like the player South Carolina coaches have the most faith in running their offense. The Gamecocks will not name a backup until the fall, Muschamp said. “I thought both guys managed our offense well (Saturday),” Muschamp said. “Both showed some really good things. To me it was all about the evaluation of those guys. That’s critical for us moving forward.” The end of the backup quarterback debate for 2019 season does not necessarily mean the end of the quarterback competition between Hilinski and Joyner. There’s a scenario where Hilinski is chosen to back up Bentley with the current offensive system, and the coaches decide that Joyner’s talents are worthy of considering an offensive playbook shakeup for the 2020 season. On Saturday, though, the most intriguing question of South Carolina’s 2019 spring practice session seemed to be answered.
  19. What this transfer showed, and didn’t show, Will Muschamp this spring April 08, 2019 THE STATE The 6-foot-4 safety had a big hit early on. He pulled in an interception on the goal line. He finished with four tackles and a couple pass break-ups. For a team that likely needs another body at safety, he seems to be a good option. But Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp needs more in some key areas. “He’s been inconsistent as far as assignment-wise and effort, to be honest with you,” Muscahmp said.”And it’s something that he certainly can improve on. He flashed today on some plays.” That included undercutting a route and almost getting a second pick in the red zone. Cook came to South Carolina from Southern Cal. The former four-star recruit left Miami to cross the country, but played sparingly as a Trojan. He spent his first year on campus as a cornerback, but before spring, the decision was made to move him to safety. The 6-foot-4 safety had a big hit early on. He pulled in an interception on the goal line. He finished with four tackles and a couple pass break-ups. For a team that likely needs another body at safety, he seems to be a good option. But Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp needs more in some key areas. “He’s been inconsistent as far as assignment-wise and effort, to be honest with you,” Muscahmp said.”And it’s something that he certainly can improve on. He flashed today on some plays.” That included undercutting a route and almost getting a second pick in the red zone. Cook came to South Carolina from Southern Cal. The former four-star recruit left Miami to cross the country, but played sparingly as a Trojan. He spent his first year on campus as a cornerback, but before spring, the decision was made to move him to safety.
  20. Gamecocks’ NFL stars like what they see at new football ops center April 07, 2019 On Saturday, some of the former Gamecocks playing in the NFL got their first look at the $50 million, 110,000-square-foot Cyndi and Kenneth Long Family Football Operations Center that opened in January. “It is unbelievable,” said Hayden Hurst, who is going into his second year with the Baltimore Ravens. “If I was a kid coming into college, that is as good as it gets. I don’t know what else you would need. Top to bottom the staircases, what else more you can want?” “Top of the line,” said Skai Moore, a member of the Indianapolis Colts. “It is a world class facility. Everything in there is just crazy for real. I was shocked when I went into there and saw it. It should be a good recruiting tool.” That’s what Gamecock coach Will Muschamp is hoping for from the new building as he shows it off to recruits. The building includes a new 26,000-square-foot, two-story weight room, 15-seat movie theater, a barbershop and the Darius Rucker recording studio. “I mean, who wouldn’t don’t want to be in a recording studio?” said Mike Davis, who just signed a free-agent contract with the Chicago Bears. “That place is ridiculous. They got a recording studio, basketball, shelf of food in there. “If I was looking at South Carolina now, of course it would sway you because of how much of how fun they would have and how much of a team they had. I would want to come here if I had all the amenities they had. It is lit.” In addition to the amenities, both Davis and Hurst said the biggest plus would be immediate access to the practice fields. In the past, players would have to cross the road to get to the Proving Grounds for practice each day. Now, players could just walk out the door to the outdoor or indoor fields. “They can walk straight out to the practice field. Our practice field, we had to walk. We didn’t have an indoor facility, we had the bubble and had to share it,” Davis said. “I’m excited for these guys. I would have slept up there if I could with everything in there and go straight in to practice.”
  21. Jake Bentley believes South Carolina's offense will hit a new gear this season: 'I think it's going to be so much faster' April 01, 2019 This time last year, there was a ton of offseason hype surrounding South Carolina’s offense under new offensive coordinator Bryan McClendon. The spring game only added fuel to the fire as Jake Bentley connected on several deep shots in the spring game that had many envisioning SEC scoreboards lighting up in the fall whenever the Gamecocks hit the field. Unfortunately, more often than not, South Carolina’s offense was stuck in neutral when coming up against quality defenses. Things appeared to have finally turned a corner when the Gamecocks put up 35 points on Clemson, and were two unsuccessful red zone trips away from scoring another 14 points in the game, but then turned around and were shut out in the bowl game against an average Virginia team. Now heading into Year 2 in the system, what are the expectations for the offense? According to Bentley, the Gamecocks will be hitting a new gear when they decide to go tempo. “I think guys will know where to line up and everything based on the calls. I think it’s going to be so much faster,” Bentley said during his Monday media availability. “I think the linemen have a good idea of understanding that it starts with them and they got to get set on the ball before we can do anything. They’ve done a great job with that so far.” McClendon has publicly commented this spring that he didn’t get the opportunity to fully install his offense in his first season. South Carolina’s starting quarterback was asked what he’s seen this spring that’s new to the team’s offense. “You can definitely see his own spin on everything and his own take,” Bentley said. “He definitely likes to push the ball down the field, he likes to be aggressive. He has an aggressive mindset, that’s what I love about him. He puts a lot of confidence in us as quarterbacks to make the right decisions and you can definitely tell he feels more comfortable with calling plays that really attack the defense.” One other interesting note Bentley shared during his interview was the fact that the seniors on the team have taken steps to ensure they take advantage of their final season in Columbia. “TJ Brunson called a senior meeting the other day and just kind of laid out the idea that guys this is our last chance to do it and we can’t let little things fall through the cracks and we really got to be particular in what we want and what our goals are and don’t let anything stand in the way,” Bentley shared. “If someone’s not doing his best to achieve the team goals, we are going to talk to them and get them in line. Everyone is responding well and really working hard.”
  22. This Gamecocks veteran making progress because ‘he’s actually listening’ March 31, 2019 THE STATE There’s something different about Brad Johnson entering his third year on South Carolina’s football team. “It’s been good because he’s actually listening to some of the things I have said,” Gamecocks outside linebackers/buck coach Mike Peterson said. “I don’t think early on he was listening.” Johnson, a 6-foot-2, 245-pound junior, is working at the buck position along with D.J. Wonnum and freshman Rodricus Fitten this spring. “He’s one of the guys in the group that has taken a really big leap,” Peterson said. “Right now, he has taken a big leap.” Peterson, a 14-year NFL veteran, has been on Johnson to make that leap for the last two seasons, he said. “He probably didn’t really believe some of the stuff I was saying, but he’s gone out and worked a couple of those things, and he’s like, ‘Woah, it actually worked,’” Peterson said. “I think he realized coach may realize a little bit of what he’s talking about.” Johnson, who has played in 24 games in his career, had 24 tackles a year ago. With 2.5 sacks and four quarterback hurries, Johnson affected the quarterback more than any Gamecock other than T.J. Brunson (four sacks, three hurries) and Bryson Allen-Williams (two sacks, five hurries). Now he wants to improve on his ability to get to the quarterback. “I have just been really focused on pass rushing (this spring),” Johnson said. “I feel like one of my specialties is playing the run, but I have been trying to perfect my pass rush skills and be in there all phases of the game.” Johnson’s pass rush is aided by his “heavy hands,” Peterson said. “He is heavy handed. He plays with his hands. He’s violent with his hands,” the coach said. “Now we want to get that motor where we are playing that way all the time.” Johnson was a four-star prospect when he signed with South Carolina out of Pendleton High School. “Coming out of high school, he was always strong, always fast,” Peterson said. “Now let’s make sure we are running in the right direction.”
  23. It’s not practice, it’s work: The NFL experience never far from Gamecocks’ minds March 28, 2019 THE STATE When South Carolina’s players talk about going to practice, Mike Peterson tells them about going to work. “I went to work every day,” Peterson says of his 14 years in the NFL. “When I hit them with that, that’s when they go, ‘Woah.’” Peterson leans on his NFL experience a lot when he’s coaching the Gamecocks outside linebackers coach, bucks and defensive ends, which he’s been doing for four seasons. “All the time,” he said. “Fourteen years, you always use that and go back to that. That’s where I spent a lot of time at. I use it all the time, meeting rooms, on the field, off the field, just talking to guys about different things. You would be surprised how many guys come to me and try to pick my brain about different things, different questions, whether it’s agents or whatever.” South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp has structured many parts of the Gamecocks program like an NFL team, a point he makes to his players often. “Definitely,” said sophomore cornerback Jaycee Horn, the son of longtime NFL wide receiver Joe Horn. “We are in here early mornings working out just like NFL teams. Basically the whole program is based off that.” Muschamp “basically says the same things that I see my dad going out and doing coaching wise,” said linebacker Damani Staley, whose dad Duce is the Philadelphia Eagles running backs coach. The Gamecocks defensive coaching staff has decidedly NFL flavor. In addition to Peterson, there’s defensive coordinator Travaris Robinson, who played two seasons in the NFL, and first-year defensive line coach John Scott Jr., who coached with the New York Jets. “Most of the players sitting in that room have aspirations of being able to go play (in the NFL),” Scott Jr. said. “Any time I am able to draw experiences from that (is good). I tell them, we are running the same type of schemes, the same type of stunts, it really adds some excitement to them.” Any talk about the NFL is “an attention-getter” for college players, Peterson said. “I think there is a lot of carryover from the NFL, but you have to remember these are still kids here,” Peterson said. “It’s a lot of different things that go on on that level, but a lot of guys here want to play at that level so we kind of use that.” For instance, if players are late for meetings, Peterson reminds them that’s “coming out of your paycheck,” at the next level. “So let’s start training yourself to walk into this meeting early,” he said. “Nine o’clock meeting doesn’t mean being here at 9:00. Nine o’clock meeting means being here at 8:50.” Horn believes that type of “professionalism” will help the Gamecocks this year, he said. “This year I think we have a lot of guys like that, being a professional on and off the field,” he said. “I feel like that’s what’s going to make us be a good team and even better defense. We have a lot of guys who act like professionals off the field.”
  24. Why can’t Dakereon Joyner or Jay Urich hold on field goals for South Carolina? March 26, 2019 Punter Joseph Charlton will hold on field goals and extra points for South Carolina’s football team this year. While he does that, reserve quarterbacks Dakereon Joyner and Jay Urich are expected to be standing on the sideline contributing nothing to the Gamecocks, at least on game days. Joyner and Urich are both highly athletic quarterbacks with good enough ball-handlings skills to be star quarterbacks for their high school teams. So, why not use Joyner or Urich as the holder to open up more options on fake kicks? Time management, says USC special teams coordinator Coleman Hutzler. “Part of it is, ‘Hey coach I am investing a lot of time in being the quarterback. I have to get warmed up, I have to do things after practice,’” Hutzler said. “That’s hard as a quarterback (who is also a holder), and the other part is just kind of natural (feel for the position).” That doesn’t mean the Gamecocks wouldn’t consider it, Hutzler said. “There’s a comfort level and it starts with (kicker Parker White), who Parker feels the best with,” Hutzler said. “We have had some conservations about a lot of different guys, and we’re still working through that but in terms of time invested, Joe is the main guy.” Charlton is South Carolina’s senior second-team All-SEC punter and can increase his professional profile by holding, Hutzler said. “That’s something for him as he wants to go to the next level as a punter, you have to prove that you can both hold and kickoff,” Hutzler said. “He’s putting a lot of time into it.” Charlton was 13th in nation in punting last year with a 44.8 yard average.
  25. Some of the names in line to replace Deebo Samuel at kick returner March 26, 2019 THE STATE Through last offseason and last football season, South Carolina football coach Will Muschampcould confidently speak about his kick return game and the danger Deebo Samuel could always pose to the opposition. Now there’s no Deebo and a big hole to fill. “It’s always tough, but we’ve got plenty of guys that are great athletes, that are explosive playmakers,” special teams coordinator Coleman Hutzler said. “We’ve got to find that guy.” Last season, Samuel averaged 24.8 yards per return. He took one for a touchdown against Ole Miss, the fourth of his career. The batch of names who might replace him is a familiar one, running through the gamut of playmakers already familiar to those following USC football. “I think A.J. Turner is a guy that’s doing a good job,” Hutzler said. “Shi Smith is doing a good job. Rico (Dowdle) can always go back there. Bryan (Edwards) can always go back there, Josh Vann. “There’s names. We’ve got to find the guy who will hit it and who can be a difference maker for us.” Turner has 28 career returns with an average of 21.1 yards. Edwards was the top returner last season. Hutzler spoke highly of Edwards’ return skills in his first year on the job. He averaged 7.9 yards on 12 returns, but Hutzler pointed to near-big plays against Kentucky and Texas A&M. And that spot isn’t 100 percent locked in either. “We’re still competing,” Hutzler said. “Shi Smith’s a guy. Josh Vann is catching it great. Jaycee Horn is back there too. We’re keeping that list long and keeping that competition open.”
×
×
  • Create New...