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  1. Kyle Krantz back on the sidelines as new special team’s coordinator and assistant defensive backs coach Jan. 17, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Kyle Krantz is back on the sideline after a very brief period off. Krantz, who was pushed into an off-field role for the Gamecocks earlier this offseason due to a staff shake-up, will once again become an assistant coach after the departure of Coleman Hutzler, head coach Will Muschamp announced Friday. In his new role, Muschamp announced in a statement Friday, Krantz will serve as special team’s coordinator and assistant defensive backs coach, helping defensive coordinator Travaris Robinson. As a result, Muschamp will coach inside linebackers, a shift away from his usual role with the defensive backs. Assistants Mike Peterson and John Scott Jr. will continue to coach outside linebackers and defensive linemen, respectively. Krantz has been at South Carolina for four seasons now he first served as analyst for the defense, not coaching for two seasons. When the NCAA approved a 10th on-field assistant in 2018, he was promoted and assisted Hutzler on special teams while also coaching nickelbacks and SAM linebackers. Coach Muschamp Statement; “After interviewing multiple people for the position, I determined Kyle is the best fit for our staff,” Muschamp in a statement. “Kyle has assisted with our special teams for the past four years, including on the field in each of the past two seasons. He has done much of the legwork and game planning for those units, and can also bring some new ideas to that facet of the game. Having Kyle take over the coordinator duties will also make for a seamless transition for our players.”
  2. Keir Thomas has one more chance Jan. 16, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Keir Thomas graduated with his guys. The Miami product and South Carolina football defensive lineman came in with the likes of Kobe Smith and D.J. Wonnum. Javon Kinlaw joined that group out of junior college a year later. All three got their bachelor’s degrees together in December. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  3. Keir Thomas has one more chance Jan. 16, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Keir Thomas graduated with his guys. The Miami product and South Carolina football defensive lineman came in with the likes of Kobe Smith and D.J. Wonnum. Javon Kinlaw joined that group out of junior college a year later. All three got their bachelor’s degrees together in December. But they’re not all leaving together. Fate had other plans for Thomas, who gets another shot at a last year and will be the really old guy in the room. Thomas said this about his second chance. “It’s crazy, man. With me being old guy a little bit this year ... me, Kinlaw and Kobe. “Last year, it was like we were the older guys. [Taylor] Stallworth, [Dante] Sawyer, those guys left. It’s nothing new to me.” Thomas was set to be a part of the 2019 defensive line rotation as a senior before his offseason ankle surgery. Then came an infection, the lingering treatment and the challenge to catch up with his conditioning after being out of the strength program for so long. So the senior gets another senior year. Thomas said. “People (ask) did it hit you? I’m like, ‘Nah.’ Because, I mean, I’m still going to take classes and stuff, start grad school and things like that. It’s a plus.” Thomas was a key recruit for Will Muschamp’s first class, a Christmas Day commit who had been a Florida State pledge at one point. He started as a bigger defensive end, but the staff wanted to try him out at tackle. Instead of getting some time to adapt, he was thrown into the fire in a short line rotation, undersized at 265 pounds. He became a starter for most of the next two years, once leading the defensive line in tackles and finishing second another time. His return will give the team a certain veteran presence. The defensive front only has Brad Johnson, Aaron Sterling and Tyreek Johnson from the 2017 class. Highly rated tackles Rick Sandidge and Zacch Pickens will likely have prominent spots, while Sterling and Kingsley Enagbare project to hold down the larger end spot. Freshmen such as Alex Huntley and Jordan Burch project to play roles, and then Thomas will be in there, providing a little versatility. Muschamp said Thomas’ “leadership ability will be very valuable.” Muschamp said. “You lose two really quality leaders and seniors inside, Javon and Kobe, two guys that have been having fantastic senior years. Dennis Wonnum, he’s another guy that’s been elected team captain in previous years.” Thomas can play both end and tackle, and has bounced around where needed. He appeared in some games late in 2019, making four tackles, one for loss, as he worked back in. Not that sitting back was in any way pleasant for him. Thomas added. “It was hard to just sit down and watch, man. Not being able to get out and help my team. I got some brothers that are going to the next level and I’m happy for them. I met people that I that I got lifetime relationships with and it was a pleasure.” The trainers had a date set for his return in 2019, he said, but he just didn’t recover fast enough to get back in time. After his playing days, Thomas aims to get into coaching. He said his coaches have said he should and that his personality suits the role. Next season, he’ll be a coach in some ways. He’ll be the eldest statesman, helping guys develop and grow their games. And it will be a moment of transition, with the guys he was so close to moving on while he gets one more chance. In closing Thomas said. “We talk about it every day, like dang, y’all are really leaving me. I wish we could do it all again.”
  4. Muschamp talking to potential candidates to replace Hutzler Jan. 15, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Yesterday South Carolina lost its second staff member to the offseason, Hutzler now is the co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach job at Texas. With the departure the Head man is already looking at potential candidates. Muschamp didn't specify which coaches he talked to for the open position but said Kyle Krantz, who coached South Carolina’s nickels and SAM linebackers this season, is a candidate to replace him. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  5. Muschamp talking to potential candidates to replace Hutzler Jan. 15, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Yesterday South Carolina lost its second staff member to the offseason, Hutzler now is the co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach job at Texas. With the departure the Head man is already looking at potential candidates. Muschamp didn't specify which coaches he talked to for the open position but said Kyle Krantz, who coached South Carolina’s nickels and SAM linebackers this season, is a candidate to replace him. Krantz was just moved back to his analyst role he held a few years ago to make room for new tight ends coach Joe Cox. Krantz has been at South Carolina since Muschamp took over and was with him at previous spots as well. Muschamp did say that there is no plan right now for when a hire will be made, saying the goal is to make the best hire possible to maximize the staff “whether that’s tomorrow or two weeks from now.” There is a little sense of urgency to make a hire with the Gamecocks able to start recruiting again this Friday as the second signing period starts the first week in February. Coaches will have a limited time about three weeks to be on the road recruiting and hosting prospects in January before the February signing period. Muschamp and the staff will all be on the road Friday and come back into town to host unofficial visitors this weekend. The Gamecocks have a few spots left in the class after signing 17 in the early period. Commitments Alex Huntley and Jordan Burch haven’t officially signed yet. Muschamp said” We have a good plan in place as far as the guys we feel like we need to sign in February. I think we have a good plan in place. We’ll be back on the road Friday and we have a big weekend this weekend with some good players coming into town unofficially.” It’ll be important to get someone in the fold somewhat quickly to help with the recruiting side of things this month. Hutzler did a lot for the Gamecocks’ staff, coaching linebackers and special teams the last four seasons and whoever replaces him will likely have a lot of responsibility as well. “We’re going to make the best hire for the University of South Carolina. We appreciate Coleman and his contributions here."
  6. VIDEO INCLUDED: Marcus Lattimore passes pantone to another Gamecock great Connor Shaw Jan. 15, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Coach Will Muschamp introduces former Gamecock Great with these words. “So I’d like to introduce somebody who needs absolutely no introduction.” with that said, Connor Shaw was officially back. The former Gamecock quarterback star made his public debut as South Carolina’s new director of player development on Wednesday, replacing another Gamecock great, Muschamp said that Marcus Lattimore, is leaving to study psychology in Europe. Connor Shaw speaks. “I’m really excited to be back. I’m thankful to coach Muschamp, I’m thankful to coach (Ray) Tanner for offering me a chance to return to my alma mater,” Shaw said in his opening statement. “And it was kind of confirmed this past Sunday night in our first team meeting how much I really missed this type of environment, coach going through the goals and expectations, seeing guys take down notes, getting ready to work and compete. So I can’t wait to be a part of their journey. But as excited as I am, this is not about me.” In his new role, Shaw will continue Lattimore’s work from the past two years helping players on the team developing on and off the field. He will not have an on-field coaching role. ,” Shaw added. “Every guy in that locker room chose the University of South Carolina, because they believed they would be developed into outstanding football players and get a great education and leave here as mature, respectable men. So when I look at my role ... building mental health, life skills, mentorship, you know, it certainly resonates with me, and to kind of dive deeper into that, looking at professional development ... helping them with decisions that set them up for success, and then developing a plan, while they’re student athletes of South Carolina, and that includes football, you know, I wouldn’t want to compartmentalize football and everything else, because we’re going to use football to accomplish what they want to accomplish outside of it all.” Shaw plans to be at South Carolina “for a very, very long time.” Quick glance back: Shaw won 27 games at South Carolina from 2010-2013. He’s also the school’s career leader in completion percentage (65.5 percent), second in career passing touchdowns (56) and fourth in career passing yards (6,074). He’s the 22nd all-time leading rusher in school history with 1,683 yards on the ground. He spent the 2014 and 2015 seasons with Cleveland Browns, starting one game in his NFL career but missed the 2015 season due to a thumb injury. He was signed by the Chicago Bears in 2016 but missed that season due to a broken leg and was waived by the Bears in May of 2017. After leaving the NFL, Shaw joined the Furman Paladins coaching staff as tight ends coach but left after spring practice in 2017.
  7. VIDEO INCLUDED: Marcus Lattimore passes pantone to another Gamecock great Connor Shaw Jan. 15, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Coach Will Muschamp introduces former Gamecock Great with these words. “So I’d like to introduce somebody who needs absolutely no introduction.” with that said, Connor Shaw was officially back. The former Gamecock quarterback star made his public debut as South Carolina’s new director of player development on Wednesday, replacing another Gamecock great, Muschamp said that Marcus Lattimore, is leaving to study psychology in Europe. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  8. Gamecock commit Alex Huntley talks what’s next Jan. 15, 2020, | GCF Staff Report 4 star DT Alex Huntley Coming off playing in the All-American Bowl. Huntley said. "This is an experience I won’t forget." He wasn’t at 100 percent. The talented defensive tackle and Gamecock commit had a bout of the flu before going against some of the top players in the country at the All-American Bowl where Huntley lost about 15 pounds because of the illness but was full-go in practice and in the game. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  9. Gamecock commit Alex Huntley talks what’s next Jan. 15, 2020, | GCF Staff Report 4 star DT Alex Huntley Coming off playing in the All-American Bowl. Huntley said. "This is an experience I won’t forget." He wasn’t at 100 percent. The talented defensive tackle and Gamecock commit had a bout of the flu before going against some of the top players in the country at the All-American Bowl where Huntley lost about 15 pounds because of the illness but was full-go in practice and in the game. Huntley tackled Stanford signee Casey Filkins on the game’s final play. Huntley said. “I played the game at like 275 pounds. I probably haven’t done that since freshman year. I thought I was much better than expected. “I got out there and competed. I still had the speed and power moves like that.” Huntley said he enjoyed everything about playing in the All-American Bowl, especially getting to compete against some of the nation’s best players. Huntley added. “My biggest thing is where I am against the competition because that is what I am going to see for the next couple years. So just learn how to compete and how to keep going.” Since returning from Texas, Huntley is working his way into basketball shape and getting back in the weight room. He is reserve forward for the Skyhawks and had two points vs. rival Cardinal Newman an 49-44 lose. Huntley, a four-star prospect, committed to South Carolina in June but he and teammate Jordan Burch didn’t sign their letters of intent with the Gamecocks during the early signing period. The next football signing period begins Feb. 5 when Huntley, Burch and their Hammond teammates will sign with their colleges. Huntley took an official visit to Virginia last month and Georgia is continuing to show interest. During interviews at the All-American Bowl, Huntley told reporters he would likely take an official visit to Georgia. He said Friday night that he wasn’t sure if he was going to take any more visits. The Gamecocks are coming off a 4-8 season and has had a busy offseason with changes on the offensive side of the ball. Mike Bobo was named the offensive coordinator and Joe Cox is the new tight ends coach. Paul Jackson also was named strength and conditioning coach. Huntley closed it out. “I have complete trust in coach Muschamp. I don’t know much about the offensive side but I have heard great things about strength coach. I am excited.”
  10. The latest talking conditioning & beyond Jan. 15, 2020, | GCF Staff Report In the Long Family Football Operations Center, the Gamecocks new strength and conditioning coach Paul Jackson has rows upon rows of barbells, dumbbells and weight machines for working out the Gamecocks. But one of the reasons Jackson most impressed coach Will Muschamp during the interview process, and a central part of his training regimen, is much simpler, at least on the surface "sprinting." Jackson’s approach to speed work is rooted in his experience at the Parisi Speed School in the early 2000s, he said, where the former football player grew to appreciate the importance of development outside the weight room. “It was a blessing, it’s a lucky opportunity I got to work there, where we got to focus on that,” Jackson said. “A lot of strength coaches, we come up in the weight room, we come up playing football, and you just know that. You don’t really get the exposure unless you had a track background. So I was able to get that and learn how to program, learn the importance of it.” So what’s the big deal about sprinting, and how is it different than just getting a lot of running in? Jackson had this to say. “Most people who don’t have a track and field background, they look at running and they think running is all the same. And you got to differentiate between sprinting and running. So, when you’re conditioning or you’re doing anything, say, under 90% of your absolute best that you can do, for whatever reason — it’s because of fatigue, it’s because we did 20 reps, it’s because your effort if for any reason you’re running less than, say, 90% of your absolute best, and when you’re looking at velocity, you’re thinking in terms of meters per second, for whatever distance you’re looking at. “So that’s not gonna be sprinting, you’re not gonna be able to get faster running at those sub-max velocities, and you’re also not stressing the tissues the same way you will when you do run above those velocities.” Talk about soft tissue and max effort dovetails nicely with what Muschamp has said about his strength and conditioning program in the past, the Gamecocks uses a system called Catapult to track players’ actions and biometrics. Muschamp said. Using that data, the Gamecock coaching staff noted halfway through this past season that skill players weren’t getting enough sprint work during practice — they set the threshold for sprinting at 80% or higher of max effort. That, in turn, led to soft tissue injuries. With that in mind, Jackson and Muschamp will be on the same page in conditioning sessions. Jackson added. “Some coaches want to see certain things, and they’ve got goals and you may see a sprint workout, which, it’s got to be a quality-based type of workout. So it’s not going to be, maybe, guys throwing up in that particular session. We’ll have other sessions where we’re dropping guys, you know, but that is not what those are for. Starting this week, when players reported back after the winter break, and before spring practice begins, Jackson said he already has a sprint program in place for guys to jump into. Jackson also said. “We will train four days a week. Two days will be those speed days we talked about, and two days will be more of traditional conditioning days, and we progress those two days opposite. So our speed work, we’ll go from short to long where you’re working with shorter sprints, less volume, and eventually going longer sprints. “The conditioning does just the opposite. You start with longer, less intense and by less intense I mean, its hard work, but it’s fewer meters per second. Slower might be a better word. So longer, slower and then those start to get shorter, faster. So as you get closer to football, those two days start to look more similar.” Jackson on the Gamecocks nutrition setup & support Jackson and Gamecock football Director of Nutrition Kristin Coggin will work together to make sure the Gamecocks train right, recover right and eat right. Jackson talks Coggins. “I value nutritionists greatly and all of these people that are experts in their field. Her setup here is unlike anything I’ve ever seen. The resources she has, the amount of food she is able to provide, the care she gives and everything she wants to get done is unbelievable. We’re going to help her in any way we can. I’m excited to see it. I’ve never been anywhere that offers this much nutritional support.” Coggin held the title of Registered Dietitian-Performance Nutrition Coordinator at Alabama for two years, she worked with football, men’s basketball, softball, and several other sports. She graduate from Tennessee with degrees in psychology in 2012 and in nutrition in 2014.
  11. The latest talking conditioning & beyond Jan. 15, 2020, | GCF Staff Report In the Long Family Football Operations Center, the Gamecocks new strength and conditioning coach Paul Jackson has rows upon rows of barbells, dumbbells and weight machines for working out the Gamecocks. But one of the reasons Jackson most impressed coach Will Muschamp during the interview process, and a central part of his training regimen, is much simpler, at least on the surface "sprinting." (VIEW ARTICLE)
  12. 1/13/2020, | GCF Staff Report Connor Shaw Named Director of Player Development One Gamecock Great Replaces Another in Pivotal Staff Role Connor Shaw, University of South Carolina's all-time winningest quarterback, will become the Director of Player Development for the Gamecock football program, coach Will Muschamp announced today. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  13. Where did the Gamecocks offensive line gradr out nationally for 2019 Jan. 10, 2020, | GCF Staff Report The Gamecocks offensive line had some very rough & disappointing days in the 2019 season. Now it is time to see the final grade on how they faired nationally. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  14. Football 1/13/2020, | GCF Staff Report Connor Shaw Named Director of Player Development One Gamecock Great Replaces Another in Pivotal Staff Role Connor Shaw, University of South Carolina's all-time winningest quarterback, will become the Director of Player Development for the Gamecock football program, coach Will Muschamp announced today. Shaw replaces Gamecock Great Marcus Lattimore, who had been in the same position since January 2018. Lattimore will depart the Gamecock staff to devote more time to personal and professional opportunities. "When Marcus and I talked before he was hired, he told me about the long-range plans he had for his personal and professional goals," said Coach Muschamp. "I knew one day Marcus would consider leaving his current role and I always had Connor Shaw in my mind as someone who could fill that position." As Director of Player Development, Shaw will work with the student-athletes and the "Beyond Football" program, focusing on career development, mental health, financial literacy and life skills. "I am excited to be back at a program that I love." said Shaw. "As an alumnus and someone who wore the Garnet and Black with pride, 'Forever to Thee' is a part of who I am so I'm grateful to contribute in making Gamecock Football the best it can be for our student-athletes." Shaw came to South Carolina after a stellar career at Flowery Branch (Ga.) High School, playing for his father, Lee Shaw. As the Gamecock starting quarterback, Shaw led Carolina to a 27-5 record, including a 17-0 record at Williams-Brice Stadium. In his four-year career, Shaw completed 480-of-733 passes (65.5 percent) for 6,074 yards with 56 touchdowns while also rushing for 1,683 yards and 17 scores. "I am confident that Connor will do a great job for our student-athletes and the entire football program," said Coach Muschamp. "He's smart, a winner, cares about developing young people and loves Carolina. No doubt, he'll be a tremendous asset for our program." The transition from Lattimore to Shaw is similar to the handoffs that the Duncan, S.C. native took from Shaw during both their Gamecock playing careers, leading to 31 wins and an SEC Eastern Division title. "I appreciate the opportunity Coach Muschamp gave me to come back to my University and mentor our football players," said Lattimore. "Our athletics administration, football staff and players made me feel welcome and appreciated. We have something building at South Carolina and I look forward to following the successes that they will soon reach." Shaw and his wife, Molly, have two children, Decker and Mila.
  15. Gamecocks making changes that could ease up on injury issues Jan. 09, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Gamecocks staff has pinpointed a key practice change that could ease up on injury issues. New Gamecock strength coach, Paul Jackson, has a background in sprinting, and that ties into one of the things the Gamecocks staff saw go wrong last season. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  16. Where did the Gamecocks offensive line grade out nationally for 2019 Jan. 10, 2020, | GCF Staff Report The Gamecocks offensive line had some very rough & disappointing days in the 2019 season. Now it is time to see the final grade on how they faired nationally. There were several faces at offensive tackle. The Gamecocks had to shake things up after the opener. All told, there were some ups and downs. And at year’s end, it didn’t grade out so well, according to Pro Football Focus. This service, grades every play and rates a slew of players across college football, released a ranking of every offensive line in the country. South Carolina slotted it at 104th nationally, ahead of only two other SEC lines, Vanderbilt and Tennessee. “When the Gamecocks’ offensive line gave up pressures, they gave them up quickly,” PFF’s Cam Mellor wrote. “They ranked fifth in terms of fastest average pressure given up at just 2.42 seconds, as they allowed 88 total pressures on their 514 snaps. They ranked just 102nd in pass-blocking grade but that was a slight improvement on their 105th-ranked run-blocking grade this season.” The rankings were based on “the PFF grade for each player to play the majority of snaps at each position, along with each team’s positional rotation, strength of schedule and percentage of positively graded plays against negatively graded plays.” That pressure number is notable because quarterback Ryan Hilinski already wasn’t particularly mobile and was less so as he played much of the season on a slightly torn meniscus in his knee. Hilinski took a lot of hits through the latter half of the season. Overall, Carolina's offense ranked 104th nationally in yards per carry against FBS opponents, though that does include sacks. The Gamecocks benched two starters from their opening day lineup after a loss to UNC and moved Donell Stanley from guard to center. Offensive tackle Dylan Wonnum also missed five games, meaning true freshmen Jakai Moore and Jaylen Nichols got starts. The Gamecocks only lose Stanley going into next season, the team’s fourth with Eric Wolford as line coach. That means Wonnum, Sadarius Hutcherson (who can play guard or tackle), Jovaughn Gwyn and Jordan Rhodes return as starters, plus Moore, Nichols, Hank Manos and Eric Douglas, who all got starts last season.
  17. How Mike Bobo plans to install his offense here at Carolina Jan. 10, 2020, | GCF Staff Report The first day he was off the road from recruiting, incoming Gamecock offensive coordinator Mike Bobo starting installing his offense. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  18. How Mike Bobo plans to install his offense here at Carolina Jan. 10, 2020, | GCF Staff Report The first day he was off the road from recruiting, incoming Gamecock offensive coordinator Mike Bobo starting installing his offense. Early on it was a few base runs, talking to the rest of his offensive staff to learn how they’d been doing things and impressing upon them the way he wants things done. He was sitting about 10 weeks from the start of spring practice, and he’s got some groundwork to lay so the heavy lifting can happen then. Bobo said. “We’ll install. I’d say probably 80% in the spring then install the other (parts) later and then we got to figure out what we’re going to be a week and a half, two weeks into fall camp. I think you got to install everything that you might be.” That last part speaks to the breadth of how many staffs put in offensive packages. They go through the offseason installing a relatively wide set of concepts and schemes, far wider than they’ll use in an individual game and maybe wider than they’ll run all season. Why do it this way? Because a team can always use more change-ups and week-to-week options, and in installing and running certain things, a staff might find out it’s good at running something unexpected. Bobo said. “I’ve run a lot of offense over the years But the base stuff we’ll install how we run it, out of what formations, and what personnel groups can change. “The base stuff will be installed, the base runs, the base concepts, throwing the football.” He laid out how the run game feeds into the play-action game, and then add drop back passing and tempo elements. Bobo’s schemes have evolved through more than a decade of calling plays, as has the sport at large. Many of his Georgia teams were based in two-back looks with fullbacks ahead of future NFL tailbacks. By the end of his time in Athens, there were some more of the shotgun looks that are the base of most current schemes. When he went to Colorado State, there was a blend of old and new. Some of his teams used the I-formation, while others based out of three-receiver sets. Many of his teams knew how to feed talented top pass-catchers; some deployed the quarterback in the run game when the talent allowed; and his final team had a quick, small receiver it could use on jet sweeps. He inherits some pieces at Carolina such as quarterback Ryan Hilinski, tailbacks Kevin Harris and Deshaun Fenwick, receiver Shi Smith and tight end Nick Muse. How he assembles and uses them that are still up in the air. Part of the value of spring comes in the every-other-day structure. Practice one day, meet and review the next. It lets the staff throw a lot at players and only then figure out what kind of offense they might be. Bobo said. “I really like spring because you get to work a lot fundamentally. You get to install a lot. There’s not a game, there’s not a scoreboard. So it’s just constant teaching and then you’re pulling all those clips back in fall and showing those guys of what they did and how they did it and how they did it right, how they might not have executed it right.”
  19. Former Georgia QB added to the Gamecock coaching staff. Bobby Bentley changes roles Jan. 09, 2020, | GCF Staff Report After Mike Bobo was hired as the Gamecock offensive coordinator, the buzz was Bobo might try to bring on his former assistant and quarterback Joe Cox. On Thursday, Will Muschamp announced how that will happen. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  20. Gamecocks making changes that could ease up on injury issues Jan. 09, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Gamecocks staff has pinpointed a key practice change that could ease up on injury issues. New Gamecock strength coach, Paul Jackson, has a background in sprinting, and that ties into one of the things the Gamecocks staff saw go wrong last season. Coach Muschamp has often stated that the training and the injuries is mostly about soft-tissue issues "as compared to broken bones or torn ligaments." Those mostly manifest themselves in hamstring injuries, and something that the Gamecocks were doing in practice the first half of last year might have been a factor there. Muschamp said. “You go back and look when we study the Catapult system, we actually were not having enough high effort runs. What we would classify, as Paul said 90, we said 80%, this past year, of some of our skill guys. We had some soft-tissue issues. We needed to have more high-effort runs than we were doing at practice.” That percent refers to a player reaching their speed capacity on a given run. The Catapult system is wearable technology that allows the staff to track movement, speed, exertion and other biometric data. The summation of Muschamp’s plan involves more full-speed runs in practice. That way, when a player goes full speed in a game, they don’t push themselves too far. Muschamp also stated. “That’s something that we studied this past year after midway through the season and it was something that we implemented as the season was going on, moving forward. But those are all things that through the weight room and our training staff, they’re constantly crunching the numbers and give us the information.” South Carolina went through a second injury-plagued season in a row, with more than 20 players missing more than 100 games they could have played. Unlike the season before, when knees and shoulders were the main culprit, soft tissue issues again popped up in 2019. Muschamp didn’t harp on them much during the season, but in his final televised coaching show, he mentioned that as a problem — less than a day before firing former strength coach Jeff Dillman. Jackson did say “I fully believe that you have to have exposure throughout the entire year to high speed sprinting to help them. With soft tissue injuries, you can’t get away from it for extended periods of time. “Having microdoses of that all throughout the year is going to be big.”
  21. Former Georgia QB added to the Gamecock coaching staff. Bobby Bentley changes roles Jan. 09, 2020, | GCF Staff Report Joe Cox Bio After Mike Bobo was hired as the Gamecock offensive coordinator, the buzz was Bobo might try to bring on his former assistant and quarterback Joe Cox. On Thursday, Will Muschamp announced how that will happen. Cox will join the staff as tight ends coach, a role he held at one point with Colorado State. Bobby Bentley will move to coach quarterbacks under Bobo, and defensive assistant Kyle Krantz will join the team in an off-field role. Cox worked with tight ends and wide receivers in his time in Fort Collins. He played quarterback for Bobo at Georgia, starting in the 2009 season. Bentley was long regarded as a quarterbacks guy through a highly successful high school coaching career. His son, Jake, started for three seasons for the Gamecocks. Krantz was promoted to the 10th assistant spot from an off-field role in January of 2018. He worked with nickels and helped with the secondary.
  22. Five Gamecocks veterans will most likely be out for spring practice Jan. 09, 2020, |GCF Staff Report Gamecocks will be without a set of key veterans through spring practice, Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp announced on Thursday. And one freshman. The injured players include: ▪ Nick Muse, a projected top tight end who is recovering from a torn ACL. ▪ Dylan Wonnum, starting offensive tackle, who had a genetic hip condition that was fixed surgically. ▪ Tyreek Johnson, reserve defensive lineman who had the same procedure wide receiver OrTre Smtih had to repair a subluxed kneecap. ▪ Kingsley Enagbare, a defensive end who hurt his hip getting cut blocked against Clemson and had to deal with that. Muschap didn’t explicitly say he was out, but did not sound optometrist. ▪ Spencer Eason-Riddle, a reserve linebacker/fullback and special teamer who tore his ACL and waited until after the Sugar Bowl to have surgery. ▪ Signee Mohamed Kaba will all miss the spring. ACL rehab after surgery this offseason.
  23. Five Gamecocks veterans will most likely be out for spring practice Jan. 09, 2020, |GCF Staff Report Gamecocks will be without a set of key veterans through spring practice, Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp announced on Thursday. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  24. Gamecock Dakereon Joyner: ‘I was never taught to quit something I started’ Jan. 07, 2020, | GCF Staff Report South Carolina football’s Dakereon Joyner appeared to put to rest any notion that he’ll transfer from the Gamecocks with a Twitter post Monday evening. “Confidence thrives on honesty, on honor, on the sacredness of obligations, on faithful protection and on unselfish performance. (VIEW ARTICLE)
  25. Gamecock Dakereon Joyner: ‘I was never taught to quit something I started’ Jan. 07, 2020, | GCF Staff Report South Carolina football’s Dakereon Joyner appeared to put to rest any notion that he’ll transfer from the Gamecocks with a Twitter post Monday evening. “Confidence thrives on honesty, on honor, on the sacredness of obligations, on faithful protection and on unselfish performance. Without them it cannot live. When GOD says it’s SHOWTIME, there isn’t a single person that can say CUT. I was never taught to quit something I started!” Joyner wrote in a tweet over his 2019 season highlights. He followed that by retweeting multiple messages that said he will not be transferring. He’s come through an eventful season the past six months. Joyner lost the battle for the backup quarterback job in 2019 to Ryan Hilinski, but unlike many QBs he decided to stick out the season, play with the team and hopefully compete for the starting spot behind center a year later. As the team’s No. 3 passer, he quickly stepped into working at wide receiver, a spot he’d never played. He ended up bouncing between there and quarterback, working sometimes as a change-of-pace player and sometimes as a true backup once Hilinski was elevated to starter. He was slowed by a hamstring issue most of the year, and came in for emergency duty to help South Carolina to an upset of No. 3 Georgia. He also missed the Clemson game with a concussion. For the season, he had 168 passing yards, 107 rushing yards and 46 receiving yards on six catches. When new offensive coordinator Mike Bobo arrived, he said Joyner told him and Muschamp that Joyner was ready to do what ever the team needed. A look back at Joyner high school career: Joyner came to Columbia as a highly decorated recruit, the No. 206 player in the 2018 class. He ran for 1,000 yards three times in high school, threw for nearly 10,000 yards and led his team to a 40-3 record, including a 15-0 state title season as a sophomore.

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