Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Football1'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • GameCock Fanatics
    • Announcements & Discussions/Suggestions Here
    • VIP Zone
    • New Member Introductions
  • Gamecock Sports
    • Gamecock Pigskin
    • Hoops Central
    • Yardcock Baseball
    • Football Recruiting News
    • Basketball Recruiting News
    • Baseball Recruiting News
    • Non-Revenue Sports
    • Gamecock Multimedia
    • Gamecock Fanatics Fan Poll
    • Gamecock & SEC Media: Gamecock & SEC Podcast
  • General Sports
    • GamecockFantics "All Sports News"
    • High School Sports
    • Rival-Pit
    • Locker Room
    • Talking SEC Sports
  • Community
    • General Chat
    • View Point
    • Technical Chat
    • Grilling/Carolina Eats Forum
    • Historical Fiction and History
    • The Photoshop Shop Room
    • Bible Discussion
    • Test, Help And Techie Forum
  • FeatheredCocks I Bleed Garnet Club's Who is going to the first game this seson

Categories

  • Football
  • Basketball
  • Baseball
  • Recruiting
  • Other Sports
  • South Carolina News

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Gamecock Football Videos
  • Gamecock Basketball Videos
  • Gamecock Baseball Videos
  • Gamecock Other Sports Videos
  • GamecockFanatics Members Non-Sports Videos

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 490 results

  1. Report: South Carolina reserve DB suspended following assault and burglary charges June 22, 2018 A South Carolina defensive back is facing charges because of what allegedly happened between him and a woman he knew, according to Davis Travis Bland at The State Newspaper. Javon Charleston, who has been suspended from the team, has been charged with assault and burglary in connection with the June 17 incident that reportedly included the woman waking up and finding the Gamecocks player at the foot of her bed early Sunday morning when she wouldn’t respond to his texts. Charleston then chased the man out of the house, according to the report. He returned to the house to find the doors locked and tried to break down the door. The report says he then began taking the screens off the windows, attempting to gain entry. The woman said that after she heard something break, Charleston was in the house, the report said. The woman ran out the back door, but Charleston caught up with her and grabbed her by the neck, calling her a “dirty slut,” and pushing her down the stairs, the woman reported. He then took her phone. The woman then hopped the fence to a neighbor’s house so she could call for help, according to the report. A redshirt junior in the upcoming season, Charleston won the special teams awards last season for tenacity and unselfishness. Charleston was the recipient of a scholarship last August after he walked on to the team in 2015. Last season, he saw some rare action at safety and was primarily a role player on special teams. He played in eight games last season, totaling 6 tackles and 2 fumble recoveries.
  2. What is going to define Will Muschamp’s time at South Carolina? Will Muschamp will certainly leave a legacy as the head coach of the Gamecocks. The only question is what that legacy will center around. June 22, 2018 https://armchairallamericans.com/ I think the biggest question anyone can ask themselves is, “What defines me?”. At least to me, that’s the biggest thing you can ask yourself. What defines you? At the end of the day, what do people say is your legacy? Different people mean different things to the University of South Carolina. Steve Spurrier is the winningest and some would consider the best head coach in USC history. A’ja Wilson is the greatest basketball player in USC history. George Rodgers is the greatest football player in USC history. The question is, “What is going to define Will Muschamp when he leaves Carolina”? I don’t know the answer to that right now, no one really does, but I have a good idea. Will Muschamp’s recruiting and attention to detail will most likely define his time at South Carolina. TJ Bruson and DJ Wonnum are two players who were overlooked 3-star recruits that turned into All-SEC players. I don’t care what you think, Steve Spurrier’s lack of attention and care towards recruiting almost ruined the football program at USC. It’s what caused a 3-9 season in 2015, what would’ve been a national championship caliber team in 2014 going 7-6, and letting that team in the upstate turn into what it is now. Coach Boom was tasked with rebuilding the “progrum”. I’m not saying Will Muschamp is going to have an overall better legacy than Steve Spurrier. That would be really hard. I just believe South Carolina is setting itself up to have a very long and successful run under Coach Muschamp. The way the program is heading, it could turn into an eight or nine win team a year and every two to three years get really hot and make a run at the SEC title. If you’re a realistic Gamecocks fan, you will take that 25/8. Sure, it’s going to be hard to compete with Georgia and the Bulldogs with the way Kirby Smart is building that program. Maybe last year was luck considering the absolutely insane amount of talented players he inherited from the Mark Richt era. I just think it’s really hard to overlook what Will Muschamp is doing right now. The recruiting class for the 2019 cycle is currently sitting at number seven nationally in the 247 composite ranking and has a good chance to finish top 10 if some more pieces fall in place. This should start to become the standard. To compete with Clemson, Georgia and Alabama, you have to recruit. Sure, making 3-star players play like 5-stars is needed too, but landing blue-chip recruits is what turns a program around. You think Clemson is a National Championship team without Deshaun Watson? No chance. Let’s get back to what I originally opened with. What is going to define Will Muschamp? A couple good years here and there and mainly mediocracy? Or will it be domination and willing his teams to succeed? Only time will tell. I just think he’s taking the right steps. Bryan McClendon and Travarious Robinson are two other coaches who are unproven as head coaches and Will Muschamp took a chance on them as coordinators. However, both of them are doing a great job so far. We will really get to see the impact of B-Mac on the offense this year. They’ve both recruited their tails off and have exceeded almost everyone’s expectations. Obviously, Will Muschamp has done a pretty good job recruiting so far. Let’s look at players that have been low to mid-3-star recruits in Muschamp’s career at USC so far that have turned in to starters or at least contributors. 2016: Parker White, Kicker Sadarius Hutcherson, OG DJ Wonnum, DE TJ Brunson, LB Kobe Smith, DT Rico Dowdle, RB Keir Thomas, DT/DE 2017: Dennis Daley, OT Sherrod Greene, LB Aaron Sterling, DE Keisean Nixon, CB That’s 10 combined starters on both sides of the football that are either going to be starters or big time contributors next year that were 3-star recruits. I’d say most teams in the SEC would like to have those players, except maybe Alabama. All of those players bring something unique to the table that Muschamp and his coaching staff saw and knew we needed. What’s being built at USC is fun to watch. If this coaching staff can continue to find three or four guys every recruiting cycle that heavily outplay their amount of stars, then South Carolina football will be very successful for a long time. I mean sure 25 5-star recruits every year would be cool, but Clemson, Georgia, and Alabama’s boosters wouldn’t allow that. Recruiting will define Will Muschamp’s legacy, whether that ends up being a good or bad thing.
  3. This South Carolina signee 'could be a 230-pound receiver' June 21, 2018 The question was posed to South Carolina football signee Tyquan Johnson, and the answer he delivered is what most players wrapping up their senior year of high school tend to say. Does he, a 6-foot-3 dynamic playmaker who lived life in a power-running offense, expect to be an impact guy with the Gamecocks quickly, or perhaps take a little time to develop? “I see myself going in and competing,” Johnson said. The Screven County High School star is going to a team that has played almost every receiver it recruited the past two years some as a true freshman. That means the group on campus is led by an experienced, deep set of veterans. (Deebo Samuel, Bryan Edwards, Shi Smith and OrTre Smith have all seen serious time as starters.) One thing that could help Johnson: his size. “He was probably close to 210 (pounds) going into the season, 205 maybe,” Screven County coach Ron Duncan said. “We took him out of weights this year so we could help him get another core class potentially if he needed it. So he’s probably lost a bit of it. “He could be a 230-pound receiver, outside guy. He’s got plenty of room to put on a bunch of weight. He’s very strong in the weight room. And then he’s one of our top lifters.” Johnson is a wide receiver who can power clean and bench 300 pounds with a good squat max as well. Duncan estimated Johnson might be down to 190 pounds or so. Early in the recruiting process he was around 180. The coach described him as “wiry strong,” raw, with a high ceiling. As a high school senior, he caught 32 passes for 661 yards and 10 scores. Nearly two in five of his 94 career high school catches went for touchdowns. College will be a different beast, but he said he relished receiving the nutrition and workout instructions USC’s support staff gave him for his last semester in high school. “It was exciting,” Johnson said. “It was a memory when I opened the book up and started reading and got through the pages. It was an exciting moment.” He admitted second semester of senior year was a challenge, balancing grades and staying in shape. A three-star prospect, Johnson is one of a few 2018 signees who have not enrolled yet at USC. Duncan said he expects Johnson’s best years will come after more development. He has skills such as beating press coverage, a quick first step and being a vertical threat. He’s got raw measurables, like one of the fastest 100-meter dash times in Georga as a junior (10.75 seconds), or leaping ability (6 feet, 2 inches). Even if he lost a little weight the past year, it shouldn’t hold him back. “Talking to coach [Bryan] McClendon and those guys at Carolina, they were like, don’t worry about it,” Duncan said. “When we get our hands on him, we’ll get him where he needs to be.” THE STATE
  4. NCAA removes a rule that stopped a current Gamecock from accepting a USC scholarship June 13, 2018 When he decided to transfer from Clemson, defensive tackle Josh Belk was afforded the luxury of an unconditional release, which allowed him to easily transfer to South Carolina. His future teammate Ty'Son Williams wasn't so lucky. His former school, North Carolina, put restrictions on him that included not being able to accept a scholarship at USC for at least a year. He instead came to USC as a walk-on for his first season, with tuition paid for by the GI Bill (his mother is in the military). He was fortunate to have that option, and went on scholarship a year later, but many don't. From now on, after an NCAA rule change, coaches will no longer be able to dictate a player's options in that way. After the change, a player will make their intentions known to their coach, and the coach will put the player's name in a transfer database within two business days. "Once the student-athlete’s name is in the database, other coaches are free to contact that individual," an NCAA release said. The older system, where coaches had to grant permission to players was designed to discourage tampering. Now the penalty for tampering has been raised. Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp has not spoken directly to this rule change, but in the past, he's voiced sentiments about making transfers too easy. “As far as undergraduate transfers, that’s something that we need to be really careful with,” Muschamp said. “You’re talking in terms of free agency. If you want to do that, there will be coaches recruiting off your campus. I’ll be honest. That’s what’s going to happen. I would not be for a situation where a young man could go and play immediately at another school. THE STATE
  5. Muschamp will love the rule change just passed by NCAA June 03, 2018 College football coaches are worried about some of the rule changes they think might be coming to their sport, but they got a big win Wednesday when the NCAA announced a change that essentially ends the redshirt season in college football. College football players can now appear in up to four games without using a season of eligibility, the NCAA ruled. “All coaches are for that,” South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp said earlier this month at the SEC’s annual spring meetings. The change means first-year players can now get their feet wet in the sport even if coaches are worried they might not be ready to play a full season. If a coach thinks a freshman might be ready, he can try him out for a game or two and know for sure without risking an entire year of eligibility. If a freshman hasn’t played after the 11th game of the season, he might as well see the field to get some experience. According to the NCAA: "The new exception allows football players to preserve a season of competition if, for example, injuries or other factors result in them competing in a small number of games." Redshirting already had become less common in college football than in the days when Muschamp was a player at the University of Georgia in the early 90s. “I needed two years,” he quipped. “I think that’s changed because of the attrition at the top end of your roster for a lot of reasons, guys transferring, guys graduating early, guys going to the NFL. You’re seeing a lot more opportunity for young players to play so you don’t see as many guys being redshirted. I never make a decision on a redshirt until we get into a season. It may not be Game 1 but he may be better at the position in Game 4 than the guy in front of him. You keep coaching and developing them and see what happens.” Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article213100679.html#storylink=cpy Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article213100679.html#storylink= According to the NCAA: "The new exception allows football players to preserve a season of competition if, for example, injuries or other factors result in them competing in a small number of games." Redshirting already had become less common in college football than in the days when Muschamp was a player at the University of Georgia in the early 90s. “I needed two years,” he quipped. “I think that’s changed because of the attrition at the top end of your roster for a lot of reasons, guys transferring, guys graduating early, guys going to the NFL. You’re seeing a lot more opportunity for young players to play so you don’t see as many guys being redshirted. I never make a decision on a redshirt until we get into a season. It may not be Game 1 but he may be better at the position in Game 4 than the guy in front of him. You keep coaching and developing them and see what happens According to the NCAA: "The new exception allows football players to preserve a season of competition if, for example, injuries or other factors result in them competing in a small number of games." Redshirting already had become less common in college football than in the days when Muschamp was a player at the University of Georgia in the early 90s. “I needed two years,” he quipped. “I think that’s changed because of the attrition at the top end of your roster for a lot of reasons, guys transferring, guys graduating early, guys going to the NFL. You’re seeing a lot more opportunity for young players to play so you don’t see as many guys being redshirted. I never make a decision on a redshirt until we get into a season. It may not be Game 1 but he may be better at the position in Game 4 than the guy in front of him. You keep coaching and developing them and see what happens.” Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article213100679.html#storylink=cpy .” Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article213100679.html#storylink=cpy cpy Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article213100679.html#storylink=c The change means first-year players can now get their feet wet in the sport even if coaches are worried they might not be ready to play a full season. If a coach thinks a freshman might be ready, he can try him out for a game or two and know for sure without risking an entire year of eligibility. If a freshman hasn’t played after the 11th game of the season, he might as well see the field to get some experien The change means first-year players can now get their feet wet in the sport even if coaches are worried they might not be ready to play a full season. If a coach thinks a freshman might be ready, he can try him out for a game or two and know for sure without risking an entire year of eligibility. If a freshman hasn’t played after the 11th game of the season, he might as well see the field to get some experience. Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article213100679.html#storylink=cpy ce. Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article213100679.html#storylink=cpy py
  6. How Jamyest Williams coming to USC is impacting Gamecocks recruiting in Georgia June 08, 2018 ATLANTA When Jamyest Williams signed with South Carolina in February of 2017, the Gamecocks didn’t just land one of the top players from the state of Georgia who was ready to come in and make an immediate impact as a freshman. USC also secured a player who was a role model for other high school athletes in the Peach State. Williams coming to South Carolina is paying off as the Gamecocks continue to make recruiting in the state of Georgia a priority. South Carolina signed eight players from the state of Georgia for the class of 2018 and already has three commits from there for the class of 2019, including defensive end Rodricus Fitten. Fitten, who is from Atlanta, committed to USC during the 2017 football season. “With Jamyest going to South Carolina and the impact he had as a freshman it really impacted my decision,” Fitten recently told The State. Williams played in 11 games as a true freshman in 2017 and finished tied for eighth on the team in tackles with 38. He was also third on the team in interceptions with two, and he added a fumble recovery. Fitten is aiming to come in and have a similar impact as a freshman when he gets his opportunity in 2019. “I’m the type of player that is hard working and likes to be the center of attention, which is like I want to be the leader. I want to come in and try to get extra workouts and all of that stuff,” Fitten said. “My strengths are I feel home when I have my hand in the dirt or just rushing the passer.” In addition to Williams, Fitten also communicates regularly with USC sophomore receiver Randrecous Davis and freshman defensive lineman Kingsley Enagbare. Both players are from the Atlanta area. “It’s fun. I get to start talking back with the people that I used to look up to,” Fitten said. “One of the freshman that came in this year was Kingsley. I’ve known him since I was 11 years old. That chemistry goes way back for us.” Even though Fitten is committed to USC and has friends on the team it doesn’t mean other programs have stopped recruiting him. He holds offers from Florida, Tennessee, Nebraska and others and plans to visit Florida and Tennessee this summer, in addition to taking trips to South Carolina. But overcoming South Carolina’s lead for the three-star prospect, who is rated as the No. 440 overall player in the country, according to the 247Sports Composite rankings will not be easy. Fitten has strong relationships with South Carolina outside linebackers coach Mike Peterson, offensive coordinator Bryan McClendon, defensive coordinator Travaris Robinson and head coach Will Muschamp. “They’re hard working. They’re good coaches. They’re worried about more than just football,” Fitten said. “South Carolina, it was different because they were one of the first schools to jump on me early and kind of build a relationship and bond with me. That made a big difference in my commitment.” THE STATE
  7. Game time set and TV Networks for first 3 games. 2018 FB Schedule
  8. This Gamecock's coaching career is starting at his high school alma mater June 04, 2018 With his playing career over, Mason Zandi wasn’t ready to give up being around football. The former South Carolina offensive lineman is getting his coaching career started at his alma mater Chapin High. Zandi is working with the offensive line for the Eagles, who just wrapped up spring practice last week and begin summer workouts this week. “I have always wanted to coach when I was playing. I thought I could enjoy it and I’m fortunate that Chapin gave me the opportunity,” Zandi said. “It means the world to me to go back to a community that has given so much to me and been so supportive.” Chapin coach Justin Gentry talked with Zandi about a year ago about coaching when his playing career was over, so he wasn’t surprised to hear from him earlier this year. The players immediately have taken to Zandi, Gentry said. “He has really wrapped his arms around everything. We are more of a gap scheme this year, similar to what he played at Carolina, and he really gives good insight,” Gentry said. “Mason always was a student of game and always wanted to learn. He wanted to know why and a reason for doing things. That was a sign of a kid who wants to be a coach.” Zandi started on the offensive line at Chapin his senior year and went on to play in 49 games (24 starts) at South Carolina. He went undrafted after 2017 NFL Draft but signed a free agent contract with the San Diego Chargers last April. The Chargers released him a month later. Zandi spent last year living Charlotte, N.C., and worked with United Rental but wanted to be closer to home and start coaching. He explored the possibility of getting into college coaching as a graduate assistant and reached out to USC coach Will Muschamp. There were wasn’t an opening with the Gamecocks or any of other colleges he contacted. Eventually, Zandi hopes to get involved on the college level, but he is looking forward to working this year with Chapin program. His day job is working with former Gamecock Ryan Brewer’s fence company, but his schedule is flexible to work around the football schedule. Zandi is one of two former Chapin players on this year’s staff along with Brandon Owens, who played at The Citadel. Known as a passionate player for the Gamecocks, Zandi brings that energy to coaching and hopes to pass along to future group of Chapin players. “I still yell and get excited,” Zandi said. “I am firm believer if you are passionate about something that you should let it show. I always wore my emotion on my sleeve and that transcends in the coaching world. I love to teach about football and life; it’s my passion. So far, it has been fun and we've got a good group of coachable guys.” THE STATE
  9. Bryce Thompson will be in the SEC next year, just not with South Carolina May 30, 2018 Bryce Thompson’s recruiting saga is over. The Dutch Fork athlete is enrolled at Tennessee, he confirmed to The State on Wednesday. The move concludes an interesting four months for Thompson, who previously committed to South Carolina on Dec. 13 but didn’t sign. Last month, Thompson was still in communication with the Gamecocks’ coaching staff. South Carolina then filled its final spot in this year’s class with a grad transfer. Tennessee, Marshall and Louisville continued to recruit Thompson after he didn’t sign with USC. He visited Tennessee in February and attended the Vols' Orange and White game. Thompson, a four-star recruit by Rivals and 247 Sports, was a two-way standout in helping Dutch Fork to its second straight Class 5A state championship. He rushed for 1,368 yards, caught 44 passes for 630 yards and 38 total touchdowns. On defense, Thompson had 27 tackles, an interception and blocked a kick on defense. He earned Most Outstanding Player honors in the Shrine Bowl after catching seven passes for 165 yards and a TD.
  10. The possible rule change that scares Will Muschamp the most this week May 29, 2018 DESTIN, FLA. South Carolina head football coach Will Muschamp wasn’t eager to take a stand on many of the issues facing the SEC at this year’s spring meetings, but he had a firm stance on one possible change. “As far as undergraduate transfers, that’s something that we need to be really careful with,” Muschamp said Tuesday on the first day of this year’s meetings. “You’re talking in terms of free agency. If you want to do that, there will be coaches recruiting off your campus. I’ll be honest. That’s what’s going to happen. I would not be for a situation where a young man could go and play immediately at another school.” College football transfers, and the penalties they face when they transfer, will be a big topic here this week among coaches and athletic directors as the NCAA considers wide-spread changes to its transfer rules. One of those changes could be the elimination of the one-year waiting period when undergraduates transfer. Count Muschamp as a no vote. “I think last year college basketball had 700 transfers,” Muschamp said. “That’s not good for college athletics. You want to go back and look at the baseball model. That was a problem when I was in school in the ‘90s. You could transfer to any school within the league and there was no penalty. One of the best things they’ve ever done is go away from that. Back in the ‘90s, you were able to go from Auburn to Georgia or Georgia to Auburn with no penalty. They went away from that rule and they think it’s the best thing they’ve ever done is not allowing that to happen. I’m not sure why we would go back to a model like that. “I hope that’s not what we do. We’re really opening up a really bad deal in my opinion if we do that.” THE STATE
  11. Why South Carolina's Bryan McClendon prefers his receivers to come in a little raw May 29, 2018 Their job was, and is, primarily to catch footballs. But the numbers say they didn’t get many chances. Josh Vann played in offenses that ran 73 and 71 percent of the time the past two years. Tyquan Johnson was in offenses that ran 83, 78 and 72 percent of the time in three years. Darius Rush was in attacks that ran 85, 62 and 60 percent, and that improved with a switch to the spread his senior season. So every member of the trio of South Carolina receivers in the 2018 class played most of their high school career in a ground-and-pound offense. The film confirms this, as Johnson’s Screven County team ran the triple-option out of the pistol, Rush was often in a three-back Power-I at C.E. Murray and Tucker High School, while it ran some spread, had plenty of formations with Vann as the lone receiver. They’ll all be playing in an offense with more throwing in college, likely with more advanced passing games. Their new position coach and offensive coordinator, Bryan McClendon, doesn’t mind having guys with that kind of background. “I like it a lot better having it that way, just because everything that they learned, I get to teach them,” McClendon said. “So you’re not having to break a lot of bad habits, to be honest with you. When it comes to route running, When it comes to releases, when it comes to reading defenses and having to adjust routes into different defenses and things like that, it’s all stuff that they’ve learned under my teaching.” He acknowledged it means they’ve often got more to learn, especially in terms of route running , than players who were steeped in pure spreads their whole career. None of the trio ever put up mammoth numbers, but all were dynamic. The most productive season any had was Vann as a junior. He had 63 catches, 4.2 per game, and made the most of them with 20.4 yards per catch (1,286 total yards). Rush had 23 catches his first four high school seasons, often taking snaps or handoffs to get the ball in his hands. As a senior, he had 47 catches, 863 yards (18.4 yards per) and 17 scores in a first-year spread that flourished. Johnson never had more than 32 catches in a season, but he averaged between 20.7 and 25.7 yards per reception with 33 touchdowns his final three seasons. They run the gamut in terms of physical profile, as Vann is smaller (5-foot-11) and dynamic, while Johnson is a 6-foot-3 long strider with room to add weight and Rush is skinny (6-foot-2, 177 pounds) with room to grow his game. Those are the things the staff looks for. Then comes the crash course in life after the ground-and-pound. “It’s a little bit more of a plain, blank canvas,” McClendon said. “The biggest thing is they have the stuff you can’t teach. That’s the beauty of evaluating and all that other stuff.” THE STATE Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/article211934514.html#storylink=cpy Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/article211934514.html#storylink=c So every member of the trio of South Carolina receivers in the 2018 class played most of their high school career in a ground-and-pound offense. The film confirms this, as Johnson’s Screven County team ran the triple-option out of the pistol, Rush was often in a three-back Power-I at C.E. Murray and Tucker High School, while it ran some spread, had plenty of formations with Vann as the lone receiver. They’ll all be playing in an offense with more throwing in college, likely with more advanced passing games. Their new position coach and offensive coordinator, Bryan McClendon, doesn’t mind having guys with that kind of background. “I like it a lot better having it that way, just because everything that they learned, I get to teach them,” McClendon said. “So you’re not having to break a lot of bad habits, to be honest with you. When it comes to route running, When it comes to releases, when it comes to reading defenses and having to adjust routes into different defenses and things like that, it’s all stuff that they’ve learned under my teaching.” He acknowledged it means they’ve often got more to learn, especially in terms of route running , than players who were steeped in pure spreads their whole career. None of the trio ever put up mammoth numbers, but all were dynamic. The most productive season any had was Vann as a junior. He had 63 catches, 4.2 per game, and made the most of them with 20.4 yards per catch (1,286 total yards). Rush had 23 catches his first four high school seasons, often taking snaps or handoffs to get the ball in his hands. As a senior, he had 47 catches, 863 yards (18.4 yards per) and 17 scores in a first-year spread that flourished. Johnson never had more than 32 catches in a season, but he averaged between 20.7 and 25.7 yards per reception with 33 touchdowns his final three seasons. They run the gamut in terms of physical profile, as Vann is smaller (5-foot-11) and dynamic, while Johnson is a 6-foot-3 long strider with room to add weight and Rush is skinny (6-foot-2, 177 pounds) with room to grow his game. Those are the things the staff looks for. Then comes the crash course in life after the ground-and-pound. “It’s a little bit more of a plain, blank canvas,” McClendon said. “The biggest thing is they have the stuff you can’t teach. That’s the beauty of evaluating and all that other s So every member of the trio of South Carolina receivers in the 2018 class played most of their high school career in a ground-and-pound offense. The film confirms this, as Johnson’s Screven County team ran the triple-option out of the pistol, Rush was often in a three-back Power-I at C.E. Murray and Tucker High School, while it ran some spread, had plenty of formations with Vann as the lone receiver. They’ll all be playing in an offense with more throwing in college, likely with more advanced passing games. Their new position coach and offensive coordinator, Bryan McClendon, doesn’t mind having guys with that kind of background. “I like it a lot better having it that way, just because everything that they learned, I get to teach them,” McClendon said. “So you’re not having to break a lot of bad habits, to be honest with you. When it comes to route running, When it comes to releases, when it comes to reading defenses and having to adjust routes into different defenses and things like that, it’s all stuff that they’ve learned under my teaching.” He acknowledged it means they’ve often got more to learn, especially in terms of route running , than players who were steeped in pure spreads their whole career. None of the trio ever put up mammoth numbers, but all were dynamic. The most productive season any had was Vann as a junior. He had 63 catches, 4.2 per game, and made the most of them with 20.4 yards per catch (1,286 total yards). Rush had 23 catches his first four high school seasons, often taking snaps or handoffs to get the ball in his hands. As a senior, he had 47 catches, 863 yards (18.4 yards per) and 17 scores in a first-year spread that flourished. Johnson never had more than 32 catches in a season, but he averaged between 20.7 and 25.7 yards per reception with 33 touchdowns his final three seasons. They run the gamut in terms of physical profile, as Vann is smaller (5-foot-11) and dynamic, while Johnson is a 6-foot-3 long strider with room to add weight and Rush is skinny (6-foot-2, 177 pounds) with room to grow his game. Those are the things the staff looks for. Then comes the crash course in life after the ground-and-pound. “It’s a little bit more of a plain, blank canvas,” McClendon said. “The biggest thing is they have the stuff you can’t teach. That’s the beauty of evaluating and all that o So every member of the trio of South Carolina receivers in the 2018 class played most of their high school career in a ground-and-pound offense. The film confirms this, as Johnson’s Screven County team ran the triple-option out of the pistol, Rush was often in a three-back Power-I at C.E. Murray and Tucker High School, while it ran some spread, had plenty of formations with Vann as the lone receiver. They’ll all be playing in an offense with more throwing in college, likely with more advanced passing games. Their new position coach and offensive coordinator, Bryan McClendon, doesn’t mind having guys with that kind of background. “I like it a lot better having it that way, just because everything that they learned, I get to teach them,” McClendon said. “So you’re not having to break a lot of bad habits, to be honest with you. When it comes to route running, When it comes to releases, when it comes to reading defenses and having to adjust routes into different defenses and things like that, it’s all stuff that they’ve learned under my teaching.” He acknowledged it means they’ve often got more to learn, especially in terms of route running , than players who were steeped in pure spreads their whole career. None of the trio ever put up mammoth numbers, but all were dynamic. The most productive season any had was Vann as a junior. He had 63 catches, 4.2 per game, and made the most of them with 20.4 yards per catch (1,286 total yards). Rush had 23 catches his first four high school seasons, often taking snaps or handoffs to get the ball in his hands. As a senior, he had 47 catches, 863 yards (18.4 yards per) and 17 scores in a first-year spread that flourished. Johnson never had more than 32 catches in a season, but he averaged between 20.7 and 25.7 yards per reception with 33 touchdowns his final three seasons. They run the gamut in terms of physical profile, as Vann is smaller (5-foot-11) and dynamic, while Johnson is a 6-foot-3 long strider with room to add weight and Rush is skinny (6-foot-2, 177 pounds) with room to grow his game. Those are the things the staff looks for. Then comes the crash course in life after the ground-and-pound. “It’s a little bit more of a plain, blank canvas,” McClendon said. “The biggest thing is they have the stuff you can’t teach. That’s the beauty of evaluating and all that other So every member of the trio of South Carolina receivers in the 2018 class played most of their high school career in a ground-and-pound offense. The film confirms this, as Johnson’s Screven County team ran the triple-option out of the pistol, Rush was often in a three-back Power-I at C.E. Murray and Tucker High School, while it ran some spread, had plenty of formations with Vann as the lone receiver. They’ll all be playing in an offense with more throwing in college, likely with more advanced passing games. Their new position coach and offensive coordinator, Bryan McClendon, doesn’t mind having guys with that kind of background. “I like it a lot better having it that way, just because everything that they learned, I get to teach them,” McClendon said. “So you’re not having to break a lot of bad habits, to be honest with you. When it comes to route running, When it comes to releases, when it comes to reading defenses and having to adjust routes into different defenses and things like that, it’s all stuff that they’ve learned under my teaching.” He acknowledged it means they’ve often got more to learn, especially in terms of route running , than players who were steeped in pure spreads their whole career. None of the trio ever put up mammoth numbers, but all were dynamic. The most productive season any had was Vann as a junior. He had 63 catches, 4.2 per game, and made the most of them with 20.4 yards per catch (1,286 total yards). Rush had 23 catches his first four high school seasons, often taking snaps or handoffs to get the ball in his hands. As a senior, he had 47 catches, 863 yards (18.4 yards per) and 17 scores in a first-year spread that flourished. Johnson never had more than 32 catches in a season, but he averaged between 20.7 and 25.7 yards per reception with 33 touchdowns his final three seasons. They run the gamut in terms of physical profile, as Vann is smaller (5-foot-11) and dynamic, while Johnson is a 6-foot-3 long strider with room to add weight and Rush is skinny (6-foot-2, 177 pounds) with room to grow his game. Those are the things the staff looks for. Then comes the crash course in life after the ground-and-pound. “It’s a little bit more of a plain, blank canvas,” McClendon said. “The biggest thing is they have the stuff you can’t teach. That’s the beauty of evaluating and all that other stuff.” Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/article211934514.html#storylink=cpy stuff.” Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/article211934514.html#storylink=cpy ther stuff.” Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/article211934514.html#storylink=cpy tuff.” Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/article211934514.html#storylink=cpy py
  12. Why college football coaches can't zing their rivals anymore May 28, 2018 The spring college football speaking tour is winding down, and it’s been another boring year on the one-liners front. If you’re of a certain age and personality bent, that makes you a little nostalgic for college football as it used to be. The (Insert Team Name Here) Club speaking gigs used to be some of the best fun of the college football season. It was at a Gator Club meeting in the offseason of 1994 that Steve Spurrier dubbed Florida State University as Free Shoes University thanks to a scandal involving star wide receiver Peter Warrick. And there’s another reason to get all wistful about college athletics’ past. Remember when someone getting free shoes was the scandal of the day? But anyway… Spurrier called the Seminoles Free Shoes University, and it was funny. Coaches were preaching to their choirs, and they felt free to take a few shots at their rivals when they did it. It was harmless, and it helped give college football the personality that separated it from the professional game. And now it’s gone, the victim of the sport’s media saturation and the increasing desire of its most high-profile coaches to "NFL-ize" the game, polishing off all the rough edges and exerting control over every aspect of what they often refer to as an “organization.” South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp finished his Spurs Up Tour on Tuesday night with a speaking engagement in front of the Florence County Gamecock Club. At every meeting, he was met by multiple reporters and did a short media session (excluding a Spartanburg trip that included a travel snafu). And then he took the podium knowing there were media members in the room and anything he might say about, say for instance, Clemson would end up in headlines by the time he was headed home. At the Gaston Country Sports Hall of Fame ceremony in April, Muschamp was speaking about his time as a coach at LSU and said, "We were at the real Death Valley, not the one somewhere else.” That was clearly a (very slight) dig at Clemson, and it ended up on social media and in headlines almost immediately. Is that the fault of a media that now operates as if every word out of football coach’s mouth is news? You’ll be surprised to know that I don’t think so. At least not entirely. We’re all to blame to some degree for a collective loss of sense of humor. A barb can’t be a barb anymore. It’s all got to be bulletin board material. It’s got to be a thing that gets hashed and rehashed as if it’s actually important. Some night, someday down the line, somewhere on one of these speaking tours across the nation, someone is going to slip up. Maybe it’ll be a position coach without enough experience on the circuit to know any better. Maybe it’ll be a head coach who’s a quart low on give-a-darn or a quart heavy on whatever was served at dinner that night. Somebody will mess up and say something interesting.
  13. Why Bryan McClendon's first USC offense could change after his first spring as OC May 25, 2018 South Carolina’s Bryan McClendon will get his first chance to build his vision for a college football offense this season. Coming into the Gamecocks’ spring practice, he had his ideas about how USC’s attack would look. That was before 15 times on the field, hours of film in various forms and a look at the development of his players. So it’s little surprise seeing where they are might shift his vision a little. “Any time you get a chance to go in and there’s a body of work and you can go in and say what’d we do good and what do we do bad?” McClendon said. “What do we need to improve on? What do we need to get rid of? What do we need to make sure we add in that’s kind of complementary to what we do good?” It’s part of his approach, not an uncommon one, of building around the talent at hand. There’s a “system,” but it bends and adapts to who can do what. He’ll go into next season with a range of pieces, many on the younger side. He’ll have three starting receivers who were underclassmen last year, top-flight playmaker Deebo Samuel off an injured season, three seasoned running backs looking to assert themselves and quarterback Jake Bentley, who didn’t take quite the sophomore season step forward many had hoped. The team also has a set of tight ends with more narrow skillsets, trying to figure out how to use the position after the departure of first-round draft pick Hayden Hurst. It was McClendon’s first time having an eye on all the offensive positions, and he said there was an emphasis on all players knowing how much they needed to improve, especially with the aim of building depth. He’ll have a few months to tinker and tweak (and talk to coaches with the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles), but he said that’s something natural for this staff. They want to be assessing and adjusting after spring, after August camp after every scrimmage and every game. “I think that has to constantly be talked about and never get tired of talking about those things,” McClendon said. “Just because, when you do, that’s when you start going backwards.”
  14. McClendon: The 'invaluable' gain USC's Shi, OrTre Smith made through last season May 24, 2018 South Carolina wide receiver Shi Smith didn’t get the luxury of easing into the college game as a true freshman. His teammate and classmate OrTre Smith did to a degree, but after Deebo Samuel got hurt three games into the 2017 football season, he found himself thrust into the starting lineup as well. The thrown-into-the-deep-end experience then might be one of their biggest assets now, at least in the eyes of offensive coordinator/wide receivers coach Bryan McClendon. “They know what it’s going to take to be successful on Saturdays now,” McClendon said. “It’s not assumed. It’s not, ‘If I do this, will this happen that way.’ Those guys, they played a bunch of ball and they know what it takes in order to be well and do well on Saturdays. That right there is invaluable.” Shi Smith started seven games and caught 26 passes for 350 yards and two touchdowns as the team’s top option at slot receiver. The 5-foot-10 Union County product caught a 53-yard touchdown in the bowl game to cap his first season. OrTre Smith played sparingly before Samuel’s injury, but evolved into one of the team’s most consistent presences, playing the second-most snaps of any receiver. At 6-foot-4, 219 pounds, he didn’t fully take advantage of his size, though he did have 30 catches for 326 yards and three scores (he didn’t show much big-play threat with no catch longer than 28 yards). With Bryan Edwards already a stalwart and Deebo Samuel set to return as one of the top playmakers in the sport, the wide receiver picture will get less clear as all four fight for snaps at three (or two) positions and try to hold off several others. Both Smiths made their way as four-star prospects who showed enough the coaches trusted them, but were still green and learning on the fly. Their position coach expects they’ll benefit from that, as they got something that can be gained only in the thick of things. “Just to get those game reps,” McClendon said. “To be able to go into each venue and not get wide-eyed now and not get overwhelmed with anything.”
  15. Why USC's Jake Bentley feels it's 'only right' to take these players under his wing May 22, 2018 Had things gone the way they were supposed to, Jay Urich and Jake Bentley would’ve come to college in the same football recruiting class. Instead, when Urich arrived on South Carolina’s campus, Jake Bentley was already a mostly established starter, having skipped his senior season and thrived in his first year on campus after wresting control of the starting job. For the past year, they’ve shared a quarterback room, Bentley facing the ups and downs of his second year, while Urich redshirted behind him and Michael Scarnecchia. They’ve learned from, first, Kurt Roper and, now, Dan Werner. But Urich has paid attention to Bentley as well, watching what he does and taking something important from his approach. “I’d probably just say the level of commitment,” Urich said. “I think he’s such a guy that, and I’ve probably grown closer to him (in spring), just because he had a lot going on with preparing for games and stuff. We still were close, but I feel (in spring), we’ve gotten a lot closer.” Being able to mentor a younger passer is in some sense a measure of paying it forward for Bentley. He came to campus a little more than a semester after Brandon McIlwian enrolled early. Both were four-star, first-year players, finding their way with guidance from Perry Orth, a walk-on-turned-starter who now has a business coaching quarterbacks. “Looking back at it, I had Perry help me,” Bentley said. “And I think it wouldn’t be right of me if I didn’t try to help those underneath me. Jay and Dakereon (Joyner), they love to learn, so it makes it easy. “They’re constantly asking me something about a play or a read, so it’s easy to teach them. And it also makes me better … being able to verbalize it to them, getting to explain makes me learn it better.” Bentley has thrown for more than 4,200 yards in his first 1 1/2 seasons, and is looking to take the helm of a new higher-tempo, run-pass option-heavy offense under Bryan McClendon. Urich’s path at USC was much more as a developmental passer. After transferring from Blue Ridge to Wren to play in a more pass-happy attack, he ran for 1,000 yards as a junior and senior. He looked somewhat raw in his first spring game, running for 38 yards and going 3-for-11 with an interception. His growth as a passer will determine what kind of role he might play going forward. He’ll have at least one, maybe two more years left with Bentley, then be battling Joyner (who has development to do as well), and likely four-star 2019 commit Ryan Hilinski. To that end, the second-year passer is savoring his time with Bentley and Scarnecchia. “They're both students of the game,” Urich said. “They’re always in here, growing and learning, and I’m just trying to piggyback off that and try to be a shadow almost, try to learn from them, ask them questions. What part of my game do you think I need to work on?”
×
×
  • Create New...