Jump to content
 South Carolina Gamecocks  vs.  Kentucky Wildcats 

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'South Carolina'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • GameCock Fanatics
    • Announcements & Discussions/Suggestions Here
    • VIP Zone
    • New Member Introductions / Happy Birthday Greetings
  • Gamecock Sports
    • Gamecock Pigskin
    • Hoops Central
    • Yardcock Baseball
    • Football Recruiting News
    • Basketball Recruiting News
    • Baseball Recruiting News
    • Non-Revenue Sports
    • Gamecock News Forums
    • Gamecock Multimedia
    • Gamecock Fanatics Fan Poll
  • General Sports
    • High School Sports
    • Rival-Pit
    • Locker Room
    • Talking SEC Sports
  • Community
    • The Chapel
    • Political Forum
    • Technical Chat
    • GCF Swap Shop Forum
    • Fanatics Babes
    • Test, Help And Techie Forum
  • FeatheredCocks I Bleed Garnet Club's Who is going to the first game this seson

Categories

  • Football
  • Basketball
  • Baseball
  • Recruiting
  • Other Sports

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Gamecock Football Videos
  • Gamecock Basketball Videos
  • Gamecock Baseball Videos
  • Gamecock Other Sports Videos
  • GamecockFanatics Members Non-Sports Videos

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 1,163 results

  1. What the Gamecocks said about Kentucky going into game week Sept. 24, 2018 Even as South Carolina’s football team wrapped up its win at Vanderbilt, a few questions already started about Kentucky. What the Gamecocks said about the Wildcats and hearing about the four-game losing streak in the series: Jake Bentley “They’re a great team. Obviously they’ve got a lot of great players, they’re coached well. We’re going to have to go in there and play well. Try not to get too wrapped up in that (streak). Obviously it’s there and everything, but just knowing that each week is a season. We’ve got to go out there and play to the best of our abilities and execute well.” Linebacker/defensive end Bryson Allen-Williams, on hearing about the streak “We understand that it’s not about what other teams do. We practice and prepare the right way, come to the games focused, ready to ball, ready to play, we can plug anybody in. A lot of the times, it’s outside things that tend to influence the way people come to the game, but we can’t let that happen. Whatever they want to say, they can say.” Coach Will Muschamp, on Sunday night “They’ve got a good football team. I was able to watch them a little bit when our game was canceled for Marshall. Benny Snell is an outstanding football player. A violent back. Runs extremely hard. They’re very good up front. Offensively, Terry Wilson’s been a good addition for them in what he does. Lynn Bowden and Dorian Baker are two really good players we’ve played against. Seven starting seniors on defense, Josh Allen has obviously been a very dominant player. Jordan Jones is a guy we’ve got a lot of respect for, Mike Edwards. So again, a lot of experience, a lot of length in the secondary, but Mark’s recruited well. They’ve got a good football team, they’re well-coached.
  2. Do Gamecocks need to get Deebo more looks? Or is something else at play in quiet start? Sept. 20, 2018 THE STATE There were stretches in South Carolina’s last game, a loss to Georgia, when to some it seemed wide receiver Deebo Samuel simply wasn’t occupying as central a role in the Gamecocks offense as he could. At least that’s what one questioner posed to USC coach Will Muschamp. “I thought in the first half, we were very effective getting him the ball in some situations,” Muschamp said. “Whether or not we lined him up in the slot, we lined him up in the backfield, we lined him up as an outside receiver. Those looks will continue to happen. “It’s hard to get him the ball when he’s standing on the sideline.” That was in reference to Georgia running 21 of the first 27 plays out of halftime, scoring three touchdowns as USC went three and out twice. The productivity wasn’t much too look at, six catches for 33 yards and a carry for a loss of 2. But the quiet numbers might just be masking another situation. In the early going, Samuel has yet to translate his explosiveness into production. Despite the Gamecocks playing in two games that were out of hand early in the third quarter, Samuel has been targeted on nearly a fourth of USC’s throws (23.8 percent). No other USC receiver is higher than 16.3 percent. Samuel has caught 13 of the 19 passes that have come his way, but he’s only averaging 6.8 yards on each of those catches. In his last mostly full season, 2016, he was at 13.3 per catch and had 16.7 per catch in his prolific start to 2017. Through the two games, he’s only got two catches longer than 10 yards, none longer than 15. He had one jet sweep pass blown up for a loss of 6, and USC just hasn’t seen that explosiveness yet. The only way to get him going is to keep getting the ball in his hands (it is only two games, after all). To do that, he’ll have to rely on those around him. “It’s a team game,” Muschamp said. “We’ve got to do a better job of staying on the field on offense and getting off the field on defense and I think that will help us a lot.”
  3. Plans for big renovations at Williams-Brice Stadium revealed Sept. 19, 2018 Williams-Brice Stadium will be getting a facelift soon. (MORE)
  4. South Carolina finally has the chance to prove what it is this season Sept. 18, 2018 THE STATE Is it time to adjust our expectations for South Carolina’s football season? Well, yes and no. Yes, in the sense that if the Gamecocks don’t reschedule a 12th game, that probably shaves a win off the final total because most people, including me, were putting the Marshall game in the win column. No, in the sense that we haven’t learned anything of substantive about South Carolina. The Gamecocks beat a team they were better than and lost to a team that was better than them. We were finally going to learn something about head coach Will Muschamp’s third team against the Thundering Herd. Instead, we and Muschamp will have to wait until Saturday against Vanderbilt to figure out more about what South Carolina is. That’s not the best scenario for the Gamecocks. The next two games will do as much any in determining what kind of season South Carolina will have. After the Vanderbilt game, South Carolina goes to Kentucky. Frankly, if the Gamecocks (or anybody else) doesn’t finish ahead of the Commodores and Wildcats in the SEC East, then it’s impossible to talk much about progress. The Gamecocks are 3-6 on the road in Muschamp’s first two seasons. The Commodores are 2-1 with that one loss coming to No. 8 Notre Dame on the road by a 22-17 score. Kentucky is 3-0 with a win over Florida. In the preseason, I believed that South Carolina was the second-best team in the SEC East. Without enough evidence from the Gamecocks to change my mind, I’m sticking with that for now. By Sept. 16, we all may know that that’s wrong.
  5. Will Muschamp addresses South Carolina game cancellation Sept. 14, 2018 Canceling South Carolina’s game against Marshall “was absolutely the right decision,” Gamecocks head coach Will Muschamp said. “I have been through several hurricanes. It’s nothing to play with,” Muschamp said Thursday night on his weekly “Carolina Calls” radio show. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the people on the coast right now.” If the South Carolina had played the game, the Gamecocks would not have used the hotel rooms they usually stay in Friday night in order to free those up for people evacuating the coast. Saturday night’s game was canceled due to the potential impact of Hurricane Florence. The Gamecocks practiced Thursday morning. They will have a weight-lifting session Friday, take Saturday off and return to practice on Sunday, Muschamp said. The Gamecocks play Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tenn., on Sept. 22. The team will be prepared to travel for that game early if the weather or power outages in Columbia make it difficult to practice in the area, Muschamp said. “You never know,” he said. “We need to be prepared all situations.” South Carolina informed its players of the cancellation via text message about 30 minutes prior to announcing the decision to the public, Muschamp said, and he was happy with the way his team responded in Thursday morning’s practice. “We had a great practice today,” he said. “I was very pleased with how our guys came in, a training camp like practice, a very difficult practice. It was really good the way our guys competed. I thought they responded well. We had a lot of juice, a lot of energy.” South Carolina will try to add a 12th game back to its football schedule, but the options are limited. The Gamecocks could play Oct. 20, on their regularly schedule bye week, or Dec. 1, if they don’t qualify for the SEC Championship Game. Muschamp is not eager to play on Oct. 20, he said. “I’m not sure playing 10 straight games is what’s best for the student-athletes,” Muschamp said. “That’s very difficult. That’s something (athletics director Ray) Tanner and I will have discussions about. We’ve already had several. We’ll continue to explore what’s best for our student-athletes.” Muschamp won’t veto an Oct. 20 game, he said. As for scheduling a game on Dec. 1, he said, “I plan on playing that weekend,” meaning in the SEC Championship Game. “I don’t know that (playing a 12th game) matters,” he said. “I don’t want to get too far ahead of myself.”
  6. Adding another game easier said than done for Gamecocks. Here’s why Sept. 13, 2018 South Carolina football fans suddenly have some free time on their hands this weekend. Maybe they can become amateur administrators. The Gamecocks announced Wednesday that they are canceling Saturday’s scheduled game against Marshall due to the potential impact of Hurricane Florence. That leaves them with only 11 games this season, at least for now. South Carolina will try to get a 12th game back on the schedule, but that’s easier said than done. “It’s way too early to start speculating what might happen, but we will take a look,” athletics director Ray Tanner said Wednesday during an interview with 107.5 The Game in Columbia. “We will probably pursue playing that 12th game if possible.” There seem to be a lot of qualifiers in that statement, which indicates that a 12th game is far from a certainty at this point, but let’s look at the options. There are only two really — Oct. 20, the Gamecocks’ regularly scheduled bye week, and Dec. 1 if the Gamecocks don’t qualify for the SEC Championship Game. If South Carolina wants to play on Oct. 20, and head coach Will Muschamp may not considering that’s right between games against Texas A&M and Tennessee, the pool of possible opponents is limited. Also with open weeks that day are Georgia, Miami, Notre Dame, Virginia Tech, West Virginia, Texas, Oklahoma State, Florida, Texas A&M, Kansas State, Boston College, Iowa State, Louisville and Northern Illinois, but only two teams in that group would have the ability to play another game because they also had games canceled by weather this weekend. That would be West Virginia and Virginia Tech, which would seem like great matchups for South Carolina fans but might not seem like great matchups for Muschamp at that point in the season. It’s extremely doubtful the Gamecocks would play on the road for an extra game, and West Virginia and Virginia Tech would each require a trip there either this year or on a return basis. So this option doesn’t make a ton of sense. The Gamecocks would have a lot more opponent options on Dec. 1 because most teams have completed their regular season by then. Of course, South Carolina would rather have a different game that day, but school officials could sign an opponent based on the contingency they are available that day. (Williams-Brice is scheduled to hold high school state championship games on Dec. 1 at the moment.) At that point, South Carolina could play Marshall (unless the Herd makes the Conference USA title game) or any other team that ended up with 11 games for the season. Nebraska and Akron had to cancel their game in Week 1 due to weather, so maybe the Zips could be an option. All of this is to say that adding a 12th game is far from a certainty at this point. The two reasons South Carolina will be motivated to do so are money and bowl eligibility. The Gamecocks were expected to make between $2 million and $2.5 million from hosting the game but as the 15th-most profitable football in the country, they can absorb that loss if necessary. Bowl eligibility is a touchier subject. Football Bowl Subdivision teams need six wins to be bowl eligible, and if South Carolina needs an extra game to get a sixth win at the end of this season, Gamecocks fans will be worried about a lot more than who the opponent is going to be. As for how being one-win short might affect South Carolina in bowl positioning, don’t worry too much about that. With the SEC office controlling so much of the bowl placement process below the top games, the Gamecocks won’t be penalized if they end up with eight wins instead of nine due to a lost game. South Carolina could find an FCS opponent to play on either date if it waved enough money around, but it already has one game scheduled against an FCS team (Chattanooga, Nov. 17) and the NCAA only allows one to count toward bowl eligibility, so the only real value in that would be whatever the Gamecocks could make at the gate and practice snaps for head coach Will Muschamp’s team. Muschamp did not address the media following Wednesday’s announcement that the Marshall game was canceled but is expected to speak Thursday night on his weekly call-in show, so we’ll find out then what thoughts he has on the subject. Until then (and after then), stay safe everybody. South Carolina 2018 football schedule *=SEC game Sept. 1 South Carolina 49, Coastal Carolina 15 Sept. 8 Georgia 41, South Carolina 17 Sept. 15 Marshall // CANCELED Sept. 22 at Vanderbilt*, 4 pm (SEC Network) Sept. 29 at Kentucky* Oct. 6 Missouri* Oct. 13 Texas A&M* Oct. 27 Tennessee* Nov. 3 at Ole Miss* Nov. 10 at Florida* Nov. 17 Chattanooga Nov. 24 at Clemson
  7. What Ray Tanner has said about South Carolina’s plans for a 12th game Sept. 13, 2018 As soon as South Carolina football announced Wednesday that this weekend’s game with Marshall would be canceled due to Hurricane Florence, Gamecock fans immediately began speculating on how or even if USC would find a way to re-add a 12th game to its schedule. (MORE)
  8. The one bright spot that might come out of South Carolina’s loss to Georgia Sept. 12, 2018 Not a lot of Gamecocks came away from South Carolina’s 41-17 loss to Georgia feeling good, but the USC offensive linemen did. “Going into the game, we were really hyped up, thinking, ‘We’re going to show something to these guys and show them that we’re legitimate.’ We did up front I think,” starting right tackle Blake Camper said. “No matter what happens, we made a statement that we’re a force to be reckoned with.” The Gamecocks rushed for only 54 yards (on 20 attempts), but head coach Will Muschamp said his offensive line “did a good job of getting a hat on a hat,” and that there were running lanes available against the Bulldogs. “I think they played well,” quarterback Jake Bentley said. “Georgia does a lot of exotic blitzes, a lot of crazy stuff that me and them really communicated well, getting it picked up for the most part. They played great. I know they were giving me their best effort and that’s all I can ask.” South Carolina surrendered one sack and two quarterback hurries against the Bulldogs. “That’s not up to our standards because we have very high standards,” Camper said. “We expect more of ourselves definitely, but I think overall we had a good game.” If the Gamecocks offensive line made the statement that Camper believes it did and if it can continue that for the next 10 games, it will go a long way toward South Carolina bouncing back from Saturday’s disappointing loss.
  9. How South Carolina will help the families of players affected by Hurricane Florence Sept. 11, 2018 As questions linger about Hurricane Florence’s impact on South Carolina’s football game against Marshall at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, there’s another effect on the Gamecocks. The effect on the players’ families. A large group of current USC players hail from Charleston, which is on the edge of the latest forecasts, and a few, notably wide receiver Bryan Edwards and guard Donell Stanley, are from Myrtle Beach or the Pee Dee, which are closer to the current path. That’s not to mention players from North Carolina. Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp said the school is already putting forward efforts to get families of the players evacuated. “All of our players’ families on the coast, we’re trying to make sure they have a place here in Columbia,” Muschamp said. “The school opportunity fund can handle that. It’s no different than, I believe it was last year, the hurricane hit South Florida, we offered all of our players’ families opportunities within the entire athletic department for their families to evacuate and come to Columbia. “We’re in the process of doing that right now.” Edwards, who is from Conway outside of Myrtle Beach, said his family is already on the move. “They’re evacuating,” Edwards said. “Coming to Columbia, staying with family members. My family is tough, always been tough.” As long as he’d been there, Edwards said he rarely had to deal with any storms that were too bad. He also said there hasn’t been much discussion among the team, either about the potential for a change in the game or the situation overall. “Not really, honestly,” Edwards said. “We’ve been so focused on Marshall and getting ourselves back on track, it really hasn’t been. As far as we know, at 7:30, we’re playing.”
  10. South Carolina athletics issues statement on current Hurricane Florence situation Sept. 10, 2018 On Monday afternoon, S.C. Gov. Henry McMaster ordered the evacuation of parts of the state and closure of schools across the Midlands and Low Country starting Tuesday. With the state of emergency declared and Hurricane Florence, a category 4 hurricane, headed toward the east coast, the University of South Carolina is going to have some decisions to make, especially with a home football game against Marshall on Saturday night. Soon after McMaster finished his afternoon press conference, the USC athletic department provided an update on its plans: “USC Athletics is currently monitoring the forecast for Hurricane Florence. The safety of everyone affected by the storm and the minimization of the impact on emergency personnel are the most important factors in making the decision. We are in communication with the National Weather Service, state and local authorities and the SEC regarding potential weather issues. Fans can monitor any updates on USC athletics events via GamecocksOnline.com, social media and local media outlets.” The university has canceled classes until further notice. The Gamecocks have had to move two games in the past three years because of weather. In 2015, heavy flooding in Columbia made the logistics of hosting a game impossible, so the game was moved to LSU. A year later, Hurricane Matthew caused enough storming in Columbia to move the Georgia game from Saturday to Sunday. Although neither of those situations was ideal, it means South Carolina has gone through moving games before should Florence force it to do so again. “Unfortunately we have some experience,” Gamecocks athletic director Ray Tanner said Saturday. “I was talking with Greg McGarity, the Georgia AD, during the game today. And I’m like, ‘You guys are a week early.’ We’ll be dealing with this, Hurricane Florence, next week.” Coastal Carolina has already moved its game. It will be played Wednesday at Campbell. Marshall will ‘do whatever we need to do’ to travel to SC, play the Gamecocks Marshall’s first trip to South Carolina in 20 years is still on. The Thundering Herd just might be rolling into Columbia differently than originally planned. MU athletic director Mike Hamrick, speaking to The State on Monday afternoon, said his program “will make every effort possible, as long as it’s safe, to get to Columbia to play that football game.” As of Monday, the Herd is scheduled to fly charter out of Huntington, West Virginia, at 3 p.m. Friday. This comes over 27 hours before Marshall kicks off with the Gamecocks on Saturday at Williams-Brice Stadium. The threat of Hurricane Florence might alter MU’s travel plans, however. “In case the weather is so bad that we can’t fly,” Hamrick said, “we’d probably get on buses Friday morning.
  11. https://sports.yahoo.com/will-muscha...220831178.html
  12. South Carolina reveals uniform combination, season-long plans for ‘Carolina’ script logo Sept. 06, 2018 South Carolina will wear its garnet helmet with the “Carolina” script logo for the second straight week against Georgia, and the Gamecocks will keep that logo on their garnet helmets the remainder of the year, head coach Will Muschamp said Thursday night. The team’s white and black helmets will continue to have the Block C logo. The Gamecocks players choose their uniform combination each week prior to the game, and on Thursday night the school revealed the selection for Saturday’s game against No. 3 Georgia in Williams-Brice Stadium. The Gamecocks football team will wear the garnet helmet plus a garnet jersey, black pants and black shoes against the Bulldogs. Uniform combos this season: ▪ Coastal Carolina: Garnet helmets, white pants, and a garnet jersey.
  13. This is the reason South Carolina changed its offense. Will it work? Sept. 06, 2018 THE STATE Saturday is why South Carolina’s Will Muschamp finally made a complete commitment to a tempo-based offense in his seventh season as a head coach in the Southeastern Conference. The No. 24 Gamecocks head coach surveyed the conference and national landscape and looked at what stood between him and the team’s stated annual goals of Beat the East and Win the State. Specifically, the defensive lines at Georgia and Clemson and South Carolina’s inability to run the football against those lines. In the four games against the Gamecocks most bitter rivals during Muschamp’s tenure, South Carolina has been outrushed 1,002 yards to 265 yards. They are 0-4. “It’s so hard offensively right now, unless you are just elite from an ability standpoint, to create explosive plays,” Muschamp said. “In order to create some explosive plays, in the passing game especially, you need to be able to run the ball and stay balanced and create one-on-ones down the field.” Nobody else is running the ball against the Bulldogs and Tigers, either. Clemson ranked 12th in the nation in rush defense last year, and Georgia ranked 20th. Alabama, which stands as a roadblock between anyone and the overall SEC crown, ranked first in the nation and allowed only 2.72 yards per carry. Modern defenses and the type of elite defensive linemen Alabama, Clemson and Georgia are stockpiling make it almost impossible for most teams in the country to have an effective run game in a traditional system. A solution, maybe the only solution for teams like South Carolina, is to go fast and steal some yards. “When you watch teams that play with tempo and how effective they are running the football, a lot of it has nothing to do with getting a hat on a hat in the run game,” Muschamp said. “A lot of it has to do with displacement of a defensive player, not being aligned or having his eyes in the right spots.” The Gamecocks (1-0) hope that comes into play Saturday at 3:30 p.m. when No. 3 Georgia (1-0) visits Williams-Brice Stadium. The Bulldogs have outrushed South Carolina 568-73 in the last two seasons, and the Gamecocks hope that their new offense and its ability to go faster will help even out that lopsided statistic. “That’s one of the biggest things that we’ve talked about as an offense, the faster you go, the more they’re going to be out position and the bigger lanes there are going to be to run the football,” South Carolina quarterback Jake Bentley said, “especially going fast in a second-and-1, third-and-1 situations to get the first down is big for our running backs, big for our offensive line to just stay in their tracks and move whatever guy is in their way.” The Gamecocks showed their fast pace sparingly in a 49-15 victory over Coastal Carolina last week. They ran for 263 yards. “I think we’ll have a similar pace, maybe even faster (this week),” South Carolina center Donell Stanley said. “If we can get these guys a little winded and tired, it’ll make our job a whole lot easier.” The Bulldogs returned two starters on the defensive line this season in tackle Tyler Clark and end Jonathan Ledbetter, and they added Notre Dame graduate transfer Jay Hayes. “We need to run the ball,” Stanley said. “That’s our biggest emphasis. It’s good for us if we can get lined up and the defense is still looking for a call. We can basically block a gap and work up to the linebackers and such. That can be a big advantage for us if we can get our tempo going.”
  14. Gamecocks crush Coastal in opener as new-look offense passes first test Sept. 01, 2018 Deebo Samuel returned. Rico Dowdle emerged. And a revamped offense moved up and down the field as South Carolina checked all the boxes it could under the circumstances in a season-opening 49-15 win over Coastal Carolina on Saturday in Williams-Brice Stadium. Now the Gamecocks (1-0) must ready themselves for the start of the SEC season and a visit from No. 3 Georgia next week when the degree of difficulty will rise dramatically. Against an overmatched Chanticleers team (Coastal was ranked 125th of 130 FBS teams in ESPN’s Football Power Index headed into the season), South Carolina showed about all it could, scoring the most points of the Will Muschamp era and the most since it beat these same Chanticleers 70-10 in 2013. Samuel, playing in his first game since missing 10 games last year due to a broken leg, had seven catches for 56 yards and a touchdown and one carry for 11 yards, and Dowdle had 105 to pace the offense. Middle linebacker T.J. Brunson led the Gamecocks with six tackles, and linebacker Bryson Allen-Williams, who also missed 10 games last year due to injury, had a sack. For the day, South Carolina outgained Coastal Carolina 557 yards to 238 yards. THREE POINTS Star of the game: Junior quarterback Jake Bentley had a career-high four touchdown passes despite playing just three quarters. Bentley finished 22-for-29 with 250 yards and no interceptions. It was the seventh time in 21-game collegiate career that he has completed more than 20 passes. Play of the game: With 1:02 left in the third quarter, Samuel hauled in a one-handed, 8-yard touchdown reception for his first score of the season. It was reminiscent of the one-handed touchdown catch he had in last year’s season-opener against North Carolina State. Stat of the game: The Gamecocks’ 557 offensive yards were their highest total since they had 588 against Western Carolina in 2016. OBSERVATIONS Youth movement: At least 11 true freshmen played in the game with cornerback Jaycee Horn becoming the first seventh true freshman to start a season-opener for South Carolina since 2009. Defensive linemen Kingsley (J.J.) Enagbare, Rick Sandidge and Josh Belk, offensive linemen Dylan Wonnum and Jovaughn Gwynn, defensive backs Israel Mukuamu and R.J. Roderick, linebackers Rosendo Louis and Ernest Jones and wide receiver Josh Vann also played. Running back rotation: Dowdle got the start at running back and showed how he earned it in the preseason. He finished with 15 carries for 105 yards and had a 22-yard touchdown catch that put South Carolina ahead 28-3 late in the second quarter. It was the fourth 100-yard game of his career. Junior Ty’Son Williams was the second back in the game and finished with 82 yards on 11 carries. Junior A.J. Turner also played in the first half but only had two carries in the game. Mon Denson did not play due to a hamstring injury. Cause for concern: Junior defensive end D.J. Wonnum left the game early in the third quarter after what appeared to be a left leg injury. Wonnum was helped off the field by trainers and went straight to the locker room. Wonnum led South Carolina in sacks last year with six sacks last year and had his career-high in tackles against Georgia with nine. If Wonnum can’t play next week, it will be the first time he’s missed a game in his 27-game career. NEXT Who: South Carolina vs. Georgia When: 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8 Where: Williams-Brice Stadium, Columbia, SC TV: CBS
  15. Five top storylines for Saturday’s USC-Coastal Carolina game August 31, 2018 Five storylines for South Carolina’s game at noon Saturday against Coastal Carolina at Williams-Brice Stadium (SEC Network): Who will start at running back? Coach Will Muschamp says the coaching staff has “a pretty good idea” of how the running back rotation will go Saturday, but he hasn’t shared that publicly. Juniors Rico Dowdle, Ty’Son Williams, A.J. Turner and Mon Denson were all listed with “OR” on the first depth chart of the season. Running backs coach Bobby Bentley said earlier in the preseason that Dowdle and Williams had separated themselves, so it’s likely that one of those two will start, but how South Carolina splits the carries will be interesting Saturday and the rest of the season. How will Deebo look? One of the SEC’s most dynamic offensive players hasn’t been on the field since Sept. 16, 2017, when he limped off the field at the end of the third quarter against Kentucky. Now senior wide receiver Deebo Samuel returns for one of the most anticipated individual seasons in recent memory at South Carolina. Samuel had 474 all-purpose yards and six touchdowns in 11 quarters of football last year. He and his teammates insist that he’s fully healthy and full speed, but Gamecocks fans will feel better if they see if for themselves Saturday. What does Bryan McClendon do next? South Carolina’s first-year offensive coordinator auditioned for the job in last year’s Outback Bowl, a 26-19 win over Michigan. Now, McClendon has had an entire offseason to fully implement his plan. The Gamecocks have promised they will go fast, at least at times. That looked good in the second half of that game against the Wolverines, not as good in the first half. An overmatched Coastal Carolina defense should give South Carolina the chance to get off to a fast start and build some momentum headed into next week’s game against Georgia. Javon Kinlaw’s breakout year? The junior defensive tackle looks like a different person than the player who started the season a year ago. At that time, he was a nearly 340-pound backup. Now he’s a 305-pound starter who’s expected to be South Carolina’s best defensive lineman. It’s possible Kinlaw could be one of the SEC’s best defensive linemen if he fulfills his potential this year. Coastal’s spread run game should give Kinlaw plenty of opportunity to show his run-stopping potential in Week 1. Kinlaw could match the 20 tackles he had last year by Week 3 this year. Will secondary shake-up pay off? Three of South Carolina’s four starters in the secondary have starting experience, but it still feels like a new group on the back end of the Gamecocks defense. Part of that is because of how much Muschamp has poor-mouthed the group in the preseason. The other part of that is how inexperienced the backups are. True freshman Jaycee Horn is expected to start at nickel. Graduate transfer J.T. Ibe will start at safety. Sophomore Jamyest Williams, who started six games last year, is listed as the top backup at nickel and safety. Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=cpy Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=cp Will secondary shake-up pay off? Three of South Carolina’s four starters in the secondary have starting experience, but it still feels like a new group on the back end of the Gamecocks defense. Part of that is because of how much Muschamp has poor-mouthed the group in the preseason. The other part of that is how inexperienced the backups are. True freshman Jaycee Horn is expected to start at nickel. Graduate transfer J.T. Ibe will start at safety. Sophomore Jamyest Williams, who started six games last year, is listed as the top backup at nickel and safety. Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=cpy y Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=c Javon Kinlaw’s breakout year? The junior defensive tackle looks like a different person than the player who started the season a year ago. At that time, he was a nearly 340-pound backup. Now he’s a 305-pound starter who’s expected to be South Carolina’s best defensive lineman. It’s possible Kinlaw could be one of the SEC’s best defensive linemen if he fulfills his potential this year. Coastal’s spread run game should give Kinlaw plenty of opportunity to show his run-stopping potential in Week 1. Kinlaw could match the 20 tackles he had last year by Week 3 this year. Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=cpy py Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=cp What does Bryan McClendon do next? South Carolina’s first-year offensive coordinator auditioned for the job in last year’s Outback Bowl, a 26-19 win over Michigan. Now, McClendon has had an entire offseason to fully implement his plan. The Gamecocks have promised they will go fast, at least at times. That looked good in the second half of that game against the Wolverines, not as good in the first half. An overmatched Coastal Carolina defense should give South Carolina the chance to get off to a fast start and build some momentum headed into next week’s game against Georgia. Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=cpy y Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=cp One of the SEC’s most dynamic offensive players hasn’t been on the field since Sept. 16, 2017, when he limped off the field at the end of the third quarter against Kentucky. Now senior wide receiver Deebo Samuel returns for one of the most anticipated individual seasons in recent memory at South Carolina. Samuel had 474 all-purpose yards and six touchdowns in 11 quarters of football last year. He and his teammates insist that he’s fully healthy and full speed, but Gamecocks fans will feel better if they see if for themselves Saturday. Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/sports/college/university-of-south-carolina/usc-football/josh-kendall-blog/article217539615.html#storylink=cpy y
  16. Gamecocks’ defense lives the bend-don’t-break lifestyle. Will it stay that way? August 30, 2018 THE STATE Those three words strung together become something football fans loathe. Bend. Don’t. Break. It’s a phrase with a lot of baggage. It’s linked to the idea of “zone defense,” which to many denotes a kind of softness. It’s often described as some brand of prevent, which is usually more a feeling of dread than any actual tactic (oh, the phrase “prevent defense prevents you from winning” will be brought up). But the past two years, and even going a little farther back for Will Muschamp, South Carolina’s defense has not only produced the numbers of a bend-don’t-break defense, but USC has done it rather well. The coach has talked about big-play prevention often. SBNation posted parts of an old playbook from a Nick Saban team, and there were explosive play guidelines and emphases. Muschamp still uses the same things. The numbers One of the better current ways to measure if a defense fits the bend-don’t-break profile comes from the numbers of SBNation’s Bill Connelly. When a team emphasizes not allowing explosive plays, it’s often because it wants to make an offense work. Big plays are bailouts. But a college offense often can’t string together eight, 10 or 12 methodical plays without something going wrong, falling behind the chains and needing something big. Connelly uses a number that measures how good teams are at stringing together those plays (it’s called success rate), which shows how good a team is at staying ahead of the chains, setting up good second and third downs or just getting first downs. He also has a metric that measures how explosive the big plays are. These numbers, along with a good measure of converting scoring chances into points, give a bit of a picture of what a defense might be aiming for. The history Last year’s Gamecocks fit a particular profile in this regard. The team was decently stout against the run. It didn’t give up big plays through the air (sixth against explosive plays), but teams could move the ball down the field (86th in opponents’ passing success rate). It somewhat matches a team that plays a lot of cover-3 defense, with an extra body in the box and outside corners having deep responsibilities and giving up the short stuff on the outside. Factoring in pass and run, USC was 20th nationally in big-play prevention, 60th in letting opponents move the ball. The Gamecocks ranked a respectable 24th in points allowed when opponents got inside their 40-yard line. The only blemish was allowing opponents to convert a high rate of third downs (this number informed by the fact opponents had to face shorter third downs than the average college team). That’s been the pattern the past few seasons for Muschamp, dating back to his time at Auburn and in some sense Florida. 2016 Gamecocks: 17th against explosive plays, 95th in stopping opponents from driving. 2015 Auburn: 7th against explosive plays, 97th in stopping opponents from driving. 2014 Florida: 8th against explosive plays, 20th in stopping opponents from driving. That last Florida team featured gobs and gobs of talent, and the simple truth is when a team has the likes of Dante Fowler, Jr. and Jonathan Bullard, with Marcus Maye, Keanu Neal, Vernon Hargreaves III and Jalen Tabor patrolling the secondary, a staff can do a lot. But despite that pattern, Muschamp has some history with the more aggressive defenses, or at least balanced in the final product. His 2013 Florida team was notably better at stopping opponents from driving (6th) nationally. The 2012 team was dominant at both, the 2011 one solid, though still slanting more bend-don’t break vs. the pass. His last Texas team was more in line with the 2013 squad.
  17. South Carolina’s newest rallying cry will get tested right away August 30, 2018 THE STATE Next week, South Carolina will play one of the best college football teams in the country. This week, the Gamecocks are going to act like that’s the case. “Every week we are going to prepare like we’re playing the best team in America, focus on playing fast and physical,” South Carolina defensive end D.J. Wonnum said. “Fall camp we said it, we’re going to focus on fall camp. Fall camp finished and now we’re going to focus on Coastal. We are just focusing on Coastal right now.” That’s Coastal Carolina, which comes to Williams-Brice Stadium on Saturday at noon for the first football game of the season. The Chanticleers are in their second season of FBS football and ranked 125th of 130 teams in the ESPN’s Football Power Index. One week after that game, No. 3 Georgia, the favorite to win the SEC’s Eastern Division, will come to Williams-Brice for what could be the most important game of South Carolina’s season. “Let’s focus and be dialed in to what we can control this week, and that’s playing Coastal. End of sentence,” Gamecocks head coach Will Muschamp said. “Whether it’s in the meeting room, whether it’s on the practice field, all of our concentration needs to be there. Everybody else can talk about all the other stuff.” To drive the point home, Muschamp handed out white plastic bracelets to all the players Tuesday that feature one of the team’s old mottos — So What? Now What? — and this year’s newest motto — EWAS, which stands for Every Week’s A Season. South Carolina senior linebacker Bryson Allen-Williams shows off his newest plastic bracelet, which reminds the Gamecocks that Every Week’s A Season. “It’s really our motto all the time. I always talk to the players about every week is a season,” Muschamp said. “We need to handle what we can control, and that’s playing Coastal. And our preparation is so important for that. So that to me was my message.” The message will get a significant test this week considering the Gamecocks are 30-point favorites headed into their first game. “I think it’s one of the most important things that us older guys have to make sure that the team is locked in on. Treat every week the same,” junior quarterback Jake Bentley said. “Coach talks about it all the time, a nameless and faceless opponent. You don’t look at the name or who they’ve beat or what they’ve done, just the scheme that they do and the players they have, go in every week and treat it like a one-game season and just prepare each and every week the same.” The Gamecocks veterans have embraced the idea, several said. “It’s probably been said, but they made it more of a motto this year, and it’s true, you have to focus in, lock in each and every week,” junior running back Ty’Son Williams said. “We are not looking past anybody. We want to put our best foot forward each and every week. We want to go out there and dominate each week.” “It’s the first season so we have to go out there and get this win,” senior linebacker Bryson Allen-Williams said. “A new season starts next week.”
  18. How Dakereon Joyner and Jay Urich will help the Gamecocks this week August 29, 2018 THE STATE Going into South Carolina’s first game Saturday against a likely overmatched Coastal Carolina, the question looms for those outside the program. Will either Dakereon Joyner or Jay Urich, USC’s young, mobile quarterbacks, set foot on the field? The only thing the Gamecocks staff is concerned about is how they’re helping this week behind the scenes. “Dakereon Joyner and Jay Urich have both been the scout team quarterbacks,” linebacker T.J. Brunson said. “They’ve done a really good job of just trying to mimic what they do. They’re doing it to the best of our abilities and just give us the looks so we can understand what the other team can do.” The Gamecocks are set to face a squad that blends option principles with a spread attack. Some teams have to dig to find a mobile quarterback to run that offense in practice, but USC has no such issue. “Both of those boys can run, so it’s just been a good look,” linebacker Bryson Allen-Williams said. “I feel like, just as far as our overall depth of the team, they’re giving us a better look. Dakereon can really run the ball and throw the ball off the option.” Joyner is a four-star true freshman who enrolled last spring, while Urich spent a year redshirting. Both can move well, but coach Will Muschamp has said they have a ways to go as passers. Last season, the Chanticleers struggled with their head coach out with illness, but still pushed Arkansas late in the year. The team has issues keeping the same quarterback on the field, but three got at least 30 carries and at least 100 positive yards (sacks put a dent in some of those numbers). Muschamp described quarterback runs and option plays as a “huge” part of what CCU does. He also said the young quarterbacks are with the main offense at times during practice. Coastal offensive coordinator Jamey Chadwell built a powerful program as head coach at Charleston Southern, averaging 266.5 yards per game on the ground his final season there. “They try to run a lot of option and spread out teams,” Brunson said. “Gut them up the middle from getting people to overflow too much. The biggest thing that we focus on is everybody doing their job.” Facing Coastal will be a welcome change for USC players, who’ve been going against each other for the past month. Some joked about the “cylinder rule,” which means they can’t touch Jake Bentley in drills and scrimmage work. That only somewhat extended to Urich and Joyner. “We thud them up,” Allen-Williams said, referring to the wrap-and-bump technique that approximates practice tackles. “But we don’t get to hit them too much.”
  19. Gamecocks grad transfer kicker not on roster as 2018 season begins August 28, 2018 Kent State graduate transfer kicker Shane Hynes was expected to compete for a starting spot with South Carolina in 2018. He won’t start the season on USC’s roster. Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp announced Hynes left the team and will enroll at Wayne State. Parker White won the starting job, Alex Woznick got the backup spot. “He did not enroll in classes here,” Muschamp said. “A wonderful young man. I hate it didn’t work here. But wanted to be closer to home and has an opportunity there. Wish him all the best.”
  20. Will Muschamp says there’s a simple (but not easy) way to defend RPOs August 27, 2018 THE STATE There is a simple defensive adjustment that can all but put a stop to the proliferation of run-pass option plays in college football. “Recruiting guys who can play man-to-man,” South Carolina head coach Will Muschamp said. So, the solution is simple in the sense that it’s easy to understand but very difficult to do. The RPO has been the most recent offensive adjustment in the constant back-and-forth between offensive and defensive coaches and systems. “Football is a cyclical thing. That’s the thing that is hot right now and people are doing a good job with it,” South Carolina defensive line coach Lance Thompson said. “It’s a challenging concept that we have to defend.” The plays target a specific defender, usually a linebacker, and quarterbacks make the decision to hand off the ball or make a quick throw based on the initial movement of that defender. It usually means an open passing lane or bad numbers against the run. “They are obviously putting us in a bind,” Gamecocks linebackers coach Coleman Hutzler. “To me, the RPOs are trying to make us indecisive. Is it a pass? Is it a run? Is it a pass? Is it a run? If we have a run fit, we’re going to fit the run. Our job is to fit the run. They don’t pay us to cover people. That’s the DBs’ jobs. We’re going to fit the run and not create indecisive linebackers. You hesitate and they hand the ball off, and they’re on you.” That’s the same rule Thompson teaches South Carolina’s defensive linemen. “First-level, second-level defenders, they are playing run,” Thompson said. “It’s a real stress on the back end, really stressful on the back end.” Beyond playing run first, there’s a specific coaching point that Thompson gives to his players. “If they blow it and the tackle doesn’t fan on the end, and we get a shot on the quarterback, we need to come hit that quarterback so that whoever is calling those plays says, ‘Is it worth getting a 6-yard completion and my quarterback getting drilled and having to play with my second quarterback?’” Thompson said. “That’s the tradeoff of those kinds of things.” Georgia and Clemson both hurt South Carolina with RPO plays last year, and one of the chief reasons Muschamp hired Dan Werner to coach quarterbacks in the offseason is Werner’s familiarity with RPOs. “The answer is you have to recruit man-to-man, then the issue you get is, ‘Can we match up against some of these guys?’ ” Muschamp said. “When you don’t match up well and you are in a situation where you’re playing a bunch of man coverage, that can create issues for you as well.” Until the Gamecocks can recruit well enough to play dominant man coverage on every snap, South Carolina’s defensive coaches will continue to try to figure out how to stop the newest offensive weapon schematically. “Everybody has different ideas on it,” Werner said. “The old saying with coaches is, ‘Whoever has the chalk last wins.’ They’re going to say, ‘Well, we’re going to do this to stop this,’ and we’re going to say, ‘Well, we’re going to do this.’ It’s a constant chess match, that’s what football is.”
  21. Choose Your Own Adventure: How to approach South Carolina’s football season August 27, 2018 THE STATE Here’s the best thing about South Carolina’s football season, which, as you may have noticed, starts Saturday: Gamecocks fans can decide for themselves how happy they want to be about it. The first option, henceforth referred to as “the correct choice,” is to be encouraged and optimistic. Three seasons removed from a three-win season, South Carolina has a reasonable chance to finish the regular season 10-2. The second option, which is only an option because certain college football fans, especially some who have lived through decades of tortured USC football history, are more content in a constant state of aggravation, is to be focused on the “2” in 10-2. The problem, of course, is that the two are South Carolina’s most bitter rival of all-time, Clemson, and South Carolina’s most bitter rival within the conference, Georgia. The choice is yours. Let’s discuss option one first. The Gamecocks were the first team outside the Associated Press Top 25 preseason poll and could jump into the rankings after the first week. South Carolina plays Coastal Carolina in the opener, while No. 20 Virginia Tech plays No. 19 Florida State, No. 22 Boise State plays Troy, No. 23 Texas plays Maryland and No. 25 LSU plays No. 8 Miami. If any of those teams lose, it opens a spot for South Carolina in the rankings. It’s possible, but not likely, that South Carolina will be the betting favorite in 10 of their 12 regular season games. They have a chance this season to put themselves a step ahead of division blue bloods Florida and Tennessee in terms of program health and stability. Review that last sentence and imagine saying it out loud 10 years ago. That seems like a season a fan could get excited about. Now let’s talk about option two. Clemson and Georgia are better than the Gamecocks. The Tigers are ranked No. 2 in the nation. The Bulldogs are ranked No. 3. Both were in the College Football Playoff last year and could be again this year ... and the next and the next, etc. The two teams that South Carolina needs to beat to fulfill its yearly goal of “Beat the East, Win the State” are a considerable step ahead. If no season that includes losses to the Tigers and Bulldogs can be a success, then this season probably is not going to be. The good news is every fan can make their own decision about how to proceed from here. Choose wisely.
  22. Here's why South Carolina football is the SEC team you need to watch in 2018 July 26, 2018 CBSSPORTS When you're making your picks in the SEC, you'll probably look at the East and write "Georgia" down in pencil. You might even write it in ink based on how the Bulldogs steamrolled through the division last season. That pick probably won't come back to bite you. But if there's one team that can sink its teeth into the Bulldogs, it's South Carolina. Entering Year 3 of the Will Muschamp era, the Gamecocks have gone to consecutive bowl games and reached the nine-win mark a year ago with a comeback win over Michigan in the Outback Bowl. Why are the Gamecocks the team to look out for in the SEC? Let's break it down. Return of a superstar Deebo Samuel only played in three games last year before a leg injury ended his season. Despite that, he still managed 250 receiving yards and three touchdown catches to pair with one rushing touchdown and two touchdowns on his only two kickoff returns of the season. That's borderline insane. Samuel is back, and the world has taken notice. He was voted a second-team All-American all-purpose player and kick returner by CBSSports.com, and a second-team All-American by the Associated Press. "Deebo for 11 quarters last year was probably the most explosive player in college football," coach Will Muschamp said. "We're looking forward to getting him the ball a bunch and having him have a healthy senior season." He's not lying. He's one of those players who not only demands respect, but demands attention. A lot of attention. His return is like adding an experienced, five-star superstar to an offense that not only has tasted success, but would have been better regardless thanks to Kurt Roper's exit and Bryan McClendon's ascension to the offensive coordinator role. Samuel's return to the Gamecocks offense would be comparable to Julio Jones returning to Alabama or A.J. Green coming back to Georgia. Yes, he's that big. An underrated quarterback Drew Lock, Jarrett Stidham and the Alabama quarterback situation have dominated headlines at the most important position on the football field, but South Carolina's Jake Bentley is one of the most underrated quarterbacks in the conference. He threw 13 touchdowns and only four interceptions in the first two months of last season, before injuries all over the offense limited his options and teams loaded up to stop star receiver Bryan Edwards. It was during that time that Samuel's absence was felt most. Bentley has the ability to stretch the field deep and will have the new offense built around what he's most comfortable with now that McClendon is running the show. Bentley isn't going to be Baker Mayfield, Deshaun Watson or any other Heisman-caliber player. But his proven ability combined with more weapons and a more structured offense will help South Carolina contend. Experience on both sides In addition to Samuel and Bentley, just look around at the Gamecocks roster. There are a lot of names you should know still hanging around the program. Edwards was a bona fide stud last year with 793 yards and five touchdowns, and will immensely benefit from Samuel taking up the attention. Rico Dowdle, Ty'Son Williams and A.J. Turner have taken turns as feature backs as injuries have hit the position hard, and had varying degrees of success. With an offense that will spread defenses out and make those holes opened by a veteran offensive line bigger than normal, the running game should be just fine even if a true No. 1 doesn't emerge. Then, you look at the defense. No, it wasn't great last year and it has to get better. But Javon Kinlaw and D.J. Wonnum lead an veteran defensive front that will not only benefit from the snaps they've already logged, but the depth that Muschamp and defensive coordinator Travaris Robinson has built behind them. T.J. Brunson has legit All-SEC potential after logging 88 tackles a year ago. Muschamp could start an all-upperclass secondary and sophomore Jamyest Williams plays defensive back and special teams a lot like former LSU star Tyrann Mathieu. At the very worst, a nine-win season that a lot of these guys were a part of last year should make the 2018 edition of the Gamecocks a tough out on a weekly basis. The schedule South Carolina's schedule is set up for the Gamecocks to play spoiler. They get Georgia at home in Week 2 of the season, when Kirby Smart's crew might not have everything set in stone for his new-look Bulldogs. They draw a dangerous Ole Miss as the rotating game out of the West at their place, and the permanent cross-division game vs. Texas A&M is at Williams-Brice Stadium. In terms of cross-division games, that's at least manageable considering that Alabama and Auburn still play in the SEC West. If South Carolina can spring the upset over Georgia in Week 2 -- and essentially put the Bulldogs in a two-game hole (one via loss and one via head-to-head tiebreaker) -- that early in the season, it has a legit shot to win the division for just the second time ever.
  23. Will Muschamp promises Gamecock fans ‘something we haven’t had in two years August 23, 2018 THE STATE Will Muschamp gave a room full of South Carolina football fans some hope that his Gamecocks were going to have a presentable running game for the first time in a while. “Bobby Bentley, our running backs coach, came up to me during camp and said, ‘I’m having more fun coaching than I’ve had in a long time,’” Muschamp told the crowd at the season-opening meeting of the Columbia Touchdown Club. “That’s because Rico (Dowdle) and Ty’Son (Williams) and A.J. (Turner) and Mon (Denson) knew they had to come in every day and compete. The competition we have had through camp is very good. What that promotes is consistency in your performance. At the end of the day, it’s the motivation of AOB – (expletive) on bench. They all want to play.” That competition at running back, combined with some shuffling on the offensive line, should help the Gamecocks finish better than 12th in the SEC in rushing, which is their best finish in Muschamp’s first two seasons. South Carolina averaged 122.2 yards per game on the ground last year. Moving Donell Stanley to center and Zack Bailey to guard gives South Carolina a better interior line than it’s had in Muschamp’s time here, he said. “You’re looking at 300-plus pounds across the board and guys who can bend their lower body and have power,” he said. “We should be able to get some movement inside. That’s something we haven’t had in two years.” Other points Muschamp addressed included: ▪ On Friday, the Gamecocks will split their team into regulars and scout team players and hold their first practice focused on season-opening opponent Coastal Carolina. ▪ Muschamp has told offensive coordinator Bryan McClendon to “err on the side of being simple” early in the season because of the number of inexperienced players who will be in the game. “We are going to have some young players playing at critical times in a game,” Muschamp said. ▪ True freshman defensive linemen J.J. Enagbare and Rick Sandidge are in the “next group” of defensive linemen after the starters, Muschamp said. ▪ True freshman cornerback Jaycee Horn will start in the team’s nickel formation, Muschamp said. Fellow true freshman Israel Mukuamu is “another guy we are excited about,” Muschamp said. ▪ The Gamecocks will try to combat predictability on offense by using more formations. “As a coach, you always go in with the idea of doing enough to give the defense or offense problems, but, ‘Are you doing so much that your kids are thinking rather than reacting?’ Muschamp said. “Do we need to be more dynamic offensively? Yeah. I think tempo is going to help us and being a little more (multiple) as far as more formations and things like that go. We need to have more variety as far as our looks are concerned.” ▪ The organizers of the Beyonce/Jay-Z concert in Williams-Brice Stadium will pay for the replacement of the playing surface, said Muschamp, who added he had no concerns that the field would be ready for the Sept. 1 opener. ▪ Asked which true freshmen he expects to contribute this year, Muschamp mentioned Horn, Mukuamu, Enagbare, Sandidge, linebacker Rosendo Louis, safety R.J. Roderick, wide receiver Josh Vann and offensive linemen Dylan Wonnum and Jovaughn Gwyn. ▪ Muschamp originally interviewed Dan Werner for South Carolina’s offensive coordinator position before deciding to promote wide receivers coach Bryan McClendon to the position and hire Werner as quarterbacks coach, Muschamp said.
  24. ESPN’s Kirk Herbstreit rates South Carolina student section among nation’s best August 22, 2018 When “2001” and “Sandstorm” play, the student section at Williams-Brice can provide some fearsome intimidation to visitors. That group got a little national respect on Wednesday from ESPN broadcaster Kirk Herbstreit. The longtime voice in college football rated USC among the top five student sections in the country in his annual Herbies awards. USC was joined by Penn State, Wisconsin, LSU and Utah. That wasn’t the Gamecocks’ only mention. USC wide receiver Deebo Samuel was listed among his top five in “most explosive player” “most exciting player” and the “Welcome back” category. Through nearly three games last season, Samuel was a darling of the sport. He counted a pair of kick return scores and two highlight-reel catches among his six touchdowns. His big plays had sparked South Carolina to a win at Missouri and proved vital in topping North Carolina State in the season opener. Then an injury and later a setback brought him back for a fifth season. The Gamecocks open their season at noon on Sept. 1 in front of that Williams-Brice student section against Coastal Carolina.
  25. How going fast could make South Carolina more explosive on the ground August 22, 2018 THE STATE COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA - A total of 75 college football teams had more runs of 20 yards or longer than South Carolina in 2017. The Gamecocks’ total of five runs of 30 yards or longer tied for the 97th-most in the country. This was the case despite some decent speed in USC’s backfield. At 184 pounds, A.J. Turner has shown his ability to turn on the jets, and Ty’Son Williams was known for his speed out of high school. But the Gamecocks believe their shift toward a higher tempo offense could be the cure. “With the tempo, I think it’ll allow for more explosive plays,” Williams said. “So I think that will be a tremendous help for us.” USC spent last season running one of the slowest-paced offenses in the country. Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp explained why that tempo can help a running game get opponents off balance, even if the front isn’t pushing opponents around. It’s, in part, because a defense is scrambling, and, in part, something else. “Fatigue makes cowards of us all,” Muschamp said. “A300-pounder doesn’t get in the right gap, and all of a sudden, he’s bounced out and you’ve got an inside zone spitting for 30 yards. It has nothing to do with physicality. “Those are things, to me, that will help us more.” USC also upgraded the level of heft inside, with Donell Stanley moving to center and Zack Bailey and Sadarius Hutcherson flanking him. Williams said there’s a certain glee in getting lined up and watching a defense scramble to match. Muschamp said there was something harrowing about having to make calls in quick spots, knowing substitutions and, perhaps, an adjustment were either difficult or impossible. “You love that,” Williams said. “You love when they’re all scrambling around. You know they’re not lined up, they’re probably not getting into their calls. So there will be some running lanes.” He has some experience on that front, as he spent his freshman season as a backup in North Carolina’s up-tempo attack under Larry Fedora. That year, Elijah Hood averaged 6.7 yards per carry. Backup T.J. Logan and quarterback Marquise Williams each averaged 6. A year later, the team’s top two backs each averaged 5.4 yards per carry or better. Now Williams is starting to feel something familiar about the offense in Columbia. “It’s very similar,” Williams said. “Just getting lined up as quick as you can. That was a pretty high-powered offense, so I think this will translate and do the same thing.”

GCF Copyright

Copyright © 2009-2018 GamecockFanatics.com - All Rights Reserved. GameCock Fanatics is an independent, fan based website. This forum is not sponsored by, or affiliated with, the University of South Carolina, or any other organization.

GamecocksFanatics.com

Youtube-Logo.jpg

GamecocksFanatics.com

paypalusc_gfc.PNG

×